Educational Attainment of Male Homicide Victims Aged 18 to 24 Years in Chicago

2006 to 2015

Corey Hazekamp*, Suzanne McLone, Sana Yousuf, Maryann Mason, Karen M Sheehan

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Homicide is a preventable public health issue that has detrimental effects on both victims and witnesses and increases health care costs. From 2006 to 2015, homicide has been the second leading cause of death for youth aged 15 to 24 years in the United States. Educational attainment has been widely regarded as a protective factor against justice system involvement and violent injury. We conducted a time-trend analysis examining educational attainment levels for male victims of homicide aged 18 to 24 years in the City of Chicago, 2006 to 2015, to describe the educational attainment of youth homicide victims in Chicago. We used data from the Illinois Violent Death Reporting System and the United States Census Bureau from 2006 to 2015. Cases included male victims of homicide, 18 to 24 years of age, the injury leading to death occurred in the City of Chicago, injury leading to death occurred between 2006 and 2015, and whether or not a high school degree or equivalent had been obtained. Data were described over time using percentages and rates per 100,000 with 95% confidence intervals. Chicago male homicide victims aged 18 to 24 years were less likely to have at least a high school degree than the general population of males aged 18 to 24 years in Chicago. The homicide rate for males aged 18 to 24 years without a high school degree was significantly higher than those with a high school degree or equivalent for every time point, except 2007, and also in four of the seven Chicago Planning Regions when compared with the other three. We found there is a concentrated risk pool for undereducated male youth in Chicago.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Interpersonal Violence
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Homicide
Wounds and Injuries
Social Justice
Censuses
Health Care Costs
Cause of Death
Public Health
Confidence Intervals
Population

Keywords

  • educational attainment
  • homicides
  • injury prevention
  • social determinants
  • violence prevention

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Applied Psychology

Cite this

@article{88bf5a596c7f4c8faa8d54cfe2bba966,
title = "Educational Attainment of Male Homicide Victims Aged 18 to 24 Years in Chicago: 2006 to 2015",
abstract = "Homicide is a preventable public health issue that has detrimental effects on both victims and witnesses and increases health care costs. From 2006 to 2015, homicide has been the second leading cause of death for youth aged 15 to 24 years in the United States. Educational attainment has been widely regarded as a protective factor against justice system involvement and violent injury. We conducted a time-trend analysis examining educational attainment levels for male victims of homicide aged 18 to 24 years in the City of Chicago, 2006 to 2015, to describe the educational attainment of youth homicide victims in Chicago. We used data from the Illinois Violent Death Reporting System and the United States Census Bureau from 2006 to 2015. Cases included male victims of homicide, 18 to 24 years of age, the injury leading to death occurred in the City of Chicago, injury leading to death occurred between 2006 and 2015, and whether or not a high school degree or equivalent had been obtained. Data were described over time using percentages and rates per 100,000 with 95{\%} confidence intervals. Chicago male homicide victims aged 18 to 24 years were less likely to have at least a high school degree than the general population of males aged 18 to 24 years in Chicago. The homicide rate for males aged 18 to 24 years without a high school degree was significantly higher than those with a high school degree or equivalent for every time point, except 2007, and also in four of the seven Chicago Planning Regions when compared with the other three. We found there is a concentrated risk pool for undereducated male youth in Chicago.",
keywords = "educational attainment, homicides, injury prevention, social determinants, violence prevention",
author = "Corey Hazekamp and Suzanne McLone and Sana Yousuf and Maryann Mason and Sheehan, {Karen M}",
year = "2018",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/0886260518807216",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "Journal of Interpersonal Violence",
issn = "0886-2605",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",

}

Educational Attainment of Male Homicide Victims Aged 18 to 24 Years in Chicago : 2006 to 2015. / Hazekamp, Corey; McLone, Suzanne; Yousuf, Sana; Mason, Maryann; Sheehan, Karen M.

In: Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 01.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Educational Attainment of Male Homicide Victims Aged 18 to 24 Years in Chicago

T2 - 2006 to 2015

AU - Hazekamp, Corey

AU - McLone, Suzanne

AU - Yousuf, Sana

AU - Mason, Maryann

AU - Sheehan, Karen M

PY - 2018/1/1

Y1 - 2018/1/1

N2 - Homicide is a preventable public health issue that has detrimental effects on both victims and witnesses and increases health care costs. From 2006 to 2015, homicide has been the second leading cause of death for youth aged 15 to 24 years in the United States. Educational attainment has been widely regarded as a protective factor against justice system involvement and violent injury. We conducted a time-trend analysis examining educational attainment levels for male victims of homicide aged 18 to 24 years in the City of Chicago, 2006 to 2015, to describe the educational attainment of youth homicide victims in Chicago. We used data from the Illinois Violent Death Reporting System and the United States Census Bureau from 2006 to 2015. Cases included male victims of homicide, 18 to 24 years of age, the injury leading to death occurred in the City of Chicago, injury leading to death occurred between 2006 and 2015, and whether or not a high school degree or equivalent had been obtained. Data were described over time using percentages and rates per 100,000 with 95% confidence intervals. Chicago male homicide victims aged 18 to 24 years were less likely to have at least a high school degree than the general population of males aged 18 to 24 years in Chicago. The homicide rate for males aged 18 to 24 years without a high school degree was significantly higher than those with a high school degree or equivalent for every time point, except 2007, and also in four of the seven Chicago Planning Regions when compared with the other three. We found there is a concentrated risk pool for undereducated male youth in Chicago.

AB - Homicide is a preventable public health issue that has detrimental effects on both victims and witnesses and increases health care costs. From 2006 to 2015, homicide has been the second leading cause of death for youth aged 15 to 24 years in the United States. Educational attainment has been widely regarded as a protective factor against justice system involvement and violent injury. We conducted a time-trend analysis examining educational attainment levels for male victims of homicide aged 18 to 24 years in the City of Chicago, 2006 to 2015, to describe the educational attainment of youth homicide victims in Chicago. We used data from the Illinois Violent Death Reporting System and the United States Census Bureau from 2006 to 2015. Cases included male victims of homicide, 18 to 24 years of age, the injury leading to death occurred in the City of Chicago, injury leading to death occurred between 2006 and 2015, and whether or not a high school degree or equivalent had been obtained. Data were described over time using percentages and rates per 100,000 with 95% confidence intervals. Chicago male homicide victims aged 18 to 24 years were less likely to have at least a high school degree than the general population of males aged 18 to 24 years in Chicago. The homicide rate for males aged 18 to 24 years without a high school degree was significantly higher than those with a high school degree or equivalent for every time point, except 2007, and also in four of the seven Chicago Planning Regions when compared with the other three. We found there is a concentrated risk pool for undereducated male youth in Chicago.

KW - educational attainment

KW - homicides

KW - injury prevention

KW - social determinants

KW - violence prevention

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85059957182&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85059957182&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/0886260518807216

DO - 10.1177/0886260518807216

M3 - Article

JO - Journal of Interpersonal Violence

JF - Journal of Interpersonal Violence

SN - 0886-2605

ER -