Effect of a mobile web app on kidney transplant candidates' knowledge about increased risk donor kidneys: A randomized controlled trial

Elisa J. Gordon*, Min Woong Sohn, Chih Hung Chang, Gwen Mcnatt, Karina Vera, Nicole Beauvais, Emily Warren, Roslyn B. Mannon, Michael G. Ison

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. Kidney transplant candidates (KTCs) must provide informed consent to accept kidneys from increased risk donors (IRD), but poorly understand them.We conducted a multisite, randomized controlled trial to evaluate the efficacy of a mobile Web application, Inform Me, for increasing knowledge about IRDs. Methods. Kidney transplant candidates undergoing transplant evaluation at 2 transplant centers were randomized to use Inform Me after routine transplant education (intervention) or routine transplant education alone (control). Computer adaptive learning method reinforced learning by embedding educational material, and initial (test 1) and additional test questions (test 2) into each chapter. Knowledge (primary outcome) was assessed in person after education (tests 1 and 2), and 1 week later by telephone (test 3). Controls did not receive test 2. Willingness to accept an IRD kidney (secondary outcome) was assessed after tests 1 and 3. Linear regression test 1 knowledge scores were used to test the significance of Inform Me exposure after controlling for covariates. Multiple imputation was used for intentionto- Treat analysis. Results. Two hundred eighty-eight KTCs participated. Intervention participants had higher test 1 knowledge scores (mean difference, 6.61; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 5.37-7.86) than control participants, representing a 44% higher score than control participants' scores. Intervention participants' knowledge scores increased with educational reinforcement (test 2) compared with control arm test 1 scores (mean difference, 9.50; 95% CI, 8.27-10.73). After 1 week, intervention participants' knowledge remained greater than controls' knowledge (mean difference, 3.63; 95% CI, 2.49-4.78) (test 3). Willingness to accept an IRD kidney did not differ between study arms at tests 1 and 3. Conclusions. Inform Me use was associated with greater KTC knowledge about IRD kidneys above routine transplant education alone.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1167-1176
Number of pages10
JournalTransplantation
Volume101
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

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Mobile Applications
Randomized Controlled Trials
Transplants
Kidney
Education
Confidence Intervals
Arm
Learning
Informed Consent
Telephone
Linear Models

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Transplantation

Cite this

Gordon, Elisa J. ; Sohn, Min Woong ; Chang, Chih Hung ; Mcnatt, Gwen ; Vera, Karina ; Beauvais, Nicole ; Warren, Emily ; Mannon, Roslyn B. ; Ison, Michael G. / Effect of a mobile web app on kidney transplant candidates' knowledge about increased risk donor kidneys : A randomized controlled trial. In: Transplantation. 2017 ; Vol. 101, No. 6. pp. 1167-1176.
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title = "Effect of a mobile web app on kidney transplant candidates' knowledge about increased risk donor kidneys: A randomized controlled trial",
abstract = "Background. Kidney transplant candidates (KTCs) must provide informed consent to accept kidneys from increased risk donors (IRD), but poorly understand them.We conducted a multisite, randomized controlled trial to evaluate the efficacy of a mobile Web application, Inform Me, for increasing knowledge about IRDs. Methods. Kidney transplant candidates undergoing transplant evaluation at 2 transplant centers were randomized to use Inform Me after routine transplant education (intervention) or routine transplant education alone (control). Computer adaptive learning method reinforced learning by embedding educational material, and initial (test 1) and additional test questions (test 2) into each chapter. Knowledge (primary outcome) was assessed in person after education (tests 1 and 2), and 1 week later by telephone (test 3). Controls did not receive test 2. Willingness to accept an IRD kidney (secondary outcome) was assessed after tests 1 and 3. Linear regression test 1 knowledge scores were used to test the significance of Inform Me exposure after controlling for covariates. Multiple imputation was used for intentionto- Treat analysis. Results. Two hundred eighty-eight KTCs participated. Intervention participants had higher test 1 knowledge scores (mean difference, 6.61; 95{\%} confidence interval [95{\%} CI], 5.37-7.86) than control participants, representing a 44{\%} higher score than control participants' scores. Intervention participants' knowledge scores increased with educational reinforcement (test 2) compared with control arm test 1 scores (mean difference, 9.50; 95{\%} CI, 8.27-10.73). After 1 week, intervention participants' knowledge remained greater than controls' knowledge (mean difference, 3.63; 95{\%} CI, 2.49-4.78) (test 3). Willingness to accept an IRD kidney did not differ between study arms at tests 1 and 3. Conclusions. Inform Me use was associated with greater KTC knowledge about IRD kidneys above routine transplant education alone.",
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Effect of a mobile web app on kidney transplant candidates' knowledge about increased risk donor kidneys : A randomized controlled trial. / Gordon, Elisa J.; Sohn, Min Woong; Chang, Chih Hung; Mcnatt, Gwen; Vera, Karina; Beauvais, Nicole; Warren, Emily; Mannon, Roslyn B.; Ison, Michael G.

In: Transplantation, Vol. 101, No. 6, 01.01.2017, p. 1167-1176.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effect of a mobile web app on kidney transplant candidates' knowledge about increased risk donor kidneys

T2 - A randomized controlled trial

AU - Gordon, Elisa J.

AU - Sohn, Min Woong

AU - Chang, Chih Hung

AU - Mcnatt, Gwen

AU - Vera, Karina

AU - Beauvais, Nicole

AU - Warren, Emily

AU - Mannon, Roslyn B.

AU - Ison, Michael G.

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N2 - Background. Kidney transplant candidates (KTCs) must provide informed consent to accept kidneys from increased risk donors (IRD), but poorly understand them.We conducted a multisite, randomized controlled trial to evaluate the efficacy of a mobile Web application, Inform Me, for increasing knowledge about IRDs. Methods. Kidney transplant candidates undergoing transplant evaluation at 2 transplant centers were randomized to use Inform Me after routine transplant education (intervention) or routine transplant education alone (control). Computer adaptive learning method reinforced learning by embedding educational material, and initial (test 1) and additional test questions (test 2) into each chapter. Knowledge (primary outcome) was assessed in person after education (tests 1 and 2), and 1 week later by telephone (test 3). Controls did not receive test 2. Willingness to accept an IRD kidney (secondary outcome) was assessed after tests 1 and 3. Linear regression test 1 knowledge scores were used to test the significance of Inform Me exposure after controlling for covariates. Multiple imputation was used for intentionto- Treat analysis. Results. Two hundred eighty-eight KTCs participated. Intervention participants had higher test 1 knowledge scores (mean difference, 6.61; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 5.37-7.86) than control participants, representing a 44% higher score than control participants' scores. Intervention participants' knowledge scores increased with educational reinforcement (test 2) compared with control arm test 1 scores (mean difference, 9.50; 95% CI, 8.27-10.73). After 1 week, intervention participants' knowledge remained greater than controls' knowledge (mean difference, 3.63; 95% CI, 2.49-4.78) (test 3). Willingness to accept an IRD kidney did not differ between study arms at tests 1 and 3. Conclusions. Inform Me use was associated with greater KTC knowledge about IRD kidneys above routine transplant education alone.

AB - Background. Kidney transplant candidates (KTCs) must provide informed consent to accept kidneys from increased risk donors (IRD), but poorly understand them.We conducted a multisite, randomized controlled trial to evaluate the efficacy of a mobile Web application, Inform Me, for increasing knowledge about IRDs. Methods. Kidney transplant candidates undergoing transplant evaluation at 2 transplant centers were randomized to use Inform Me after routine transplant education (intervention) or routine transplant education alone (control). Computer adaptive learning method reinforced learning by embedding educational material, and initial (test 1) and additional test questions (test 2) into each chapter. Knowledge (primary outcome) was assessed in person after education (tests 1 and 2), and 1 week later by telephone (test 3). Controls did not receive test 2. Willingness to accept an IRD kidney (secondary outcome) was assessed after tests 1 and 3. Linear regression test 1 knowledge scores were used to test the significance of Inform Me exposure after controlling for covariates. Multiple imputation was used for intentionto- Treat analysis. Results. Two hundred eighty-eight KTCs participated. Intervention participants had higher test 1 knowledge scores (mean difference, 6.61; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 5.37-7.86) than control participants, representing a 44% higher score than control participants' scores. Intervention participants' knowledge scores increased with educational reinforcement (test 2) compared with control arm test 1 scores (mean difference, 9.50; 95% CI, 8.27-10.73). After 1 week, intervention participants' knowledge remained greater than controls' knowledge (mean difference, 3.63; 95% CI, 2.49-4.78) (test 3). Willingness to accept an IRD kidney did not differ between study arms at tests 1 and 3. Conclusions. Inform Me use was associated with greater KTC knowledge about IRD kidneys above routine transplant education alone.

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