Effect of antenatal corticosteroids on respiratory morbidity in singletons after late-preterm birth

Cynthia Gyamfi-Bannerman*, Sharon Gilbert, Mark B. Landon, Catherine Y. Spong, Dwight J. Rouse, Michael W. Varner, Paul J. Meis, Ronald J. Wapner, Yoram Sorokin, Marshall Carpenter, Alan M Peaceman, Mary J. O'Sullivan, Baha M. Sibai, John M. Thorp, Susan M. Ramin, Brian M. Mercer

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether neonates born to women who previously had received antenatal corticosteroids and then delivered a late-preterm-birth neonate had less respiratory morbidity compared with those not exposed to antenatal corticosteroids. METHODS: This is a secondary analysis from a multi-center observational study regarding mode of delivery after previous cesarean delivery. We compared women who received one course of antenatal corticosteroids with unexposed parturients and evaluated various respiratory outcomes among those having a singleton, latepreterm- birth neonate. We controlled for potential confounders including gestational age at delivery, diabetes, mode of delivery, and maternal race. RESULTS: Five thousand nine hundred twenty-four patients met the inclusion criteria; 550 received steroids and 5,374 did not. In the univariable model, compared with unexposed women, those who received antenatal corticosteroids appeared more likely to have neonates who required ventilatory support (11.5% compared with 8.6%, P=.022), had respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) (17.1% compared with 12.2%, P=.001), developed transient tachypnea of the newborn (12.9% compared with 9.8%, P=.020), or required resuscitation in the delivery room (55.8% compared with 49.7%, P=.007). After controlling for confounding factors, we found no significant differences among the groups regarding all of the above outcomes with an odds ratio for RDS of 0.78 (95% confidence interval, 0.60-1.02) and ventilator support of 0.75 (95% confidence interval, 0.55-1.03). CONCLUSION: Exposure to antenatal corticosteroids does not significantly affect respiratory outcomes among those with a subsequent late-preterm birth.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)555-559
Number of pages5
JournalObstetrics and Gynecology
Volume119
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2012

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Premature Birth
Adrenal Cortex Hormones
Morbidity
Newborn Infant
Transient Tachypnea of the Newborn
Parturition
Confidence Intervals
Delivery Rooms
Mechanical Ventilators
Resuscitation
Gestational Age
Observational Studies
Odds Ratio
Steroids
Mothers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Gyamfi-Bannerman, C., Gilbert, S., Landon, M. B., Spong, C. Y., Rouse, D. J., Varner, M. W., ... Mercer, B. M. (2012). Effect of antenatal corticosteroids on respiratory morbidity in singletons after late-preterm birth. Obstetrics and Gynecology, 119(3), 555-559. https://doi.org/10.1097/AOG.0b013e31824758f6
Gyamfi-Bannerman, Cynthia ; Gilbert, Sharon ; Landon, Mark B. ; Spong, Catherine Y. ; Rouse, Dwight J. ; Varner, Michael W. ; Meis, Paul J. ; Wapner, Ronald J. ; Sorokin, Yoram ; Carpenter, Marshall ; Peaceman, Alan M ; O'Sullivan, Mary J. ; Sibai, Baha M. ; Thorp, John M. ; Ramin, Susan M. ; Mercer, Brian M. / Effect of antenatal corticosteroids on respiratory morbidity in singletons after late-preterm birth. In: Obstetrics and Gynecology. 2012 ; Vol. 119, No. 3. pp. 555-559.
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abstract = "OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether neonates born to women who previously had received antenatal corticosteroids and then delivered a late-preterm-birth neonate had less respiratory morbidity compared with those not exposed to antenatal corticosteroids. METHODS: This is a secondary analysis from a multi-center observational study regarding mode of delivery after previous cesarean delivery. We compared women who received one course of antenatal corticosteroids with unexposed parturients and evaluated various respiratory outcomes among those having a singleton, latepreterm- birth neonate. We controlled for potential confounders including gestational age at delivery, diabetes, mode of delivery, and maternal race. RESULTS: Five thousand nine hundred twenty-four patients met the inclusion criteria; 550 received steroids and 5,374 did not. In the univariable model, compared with unexposed women, those who received antenatal corticosteroids appeared more likely to have neonates who required ventilatory support (11.5{\%} compared with 8.6{\%}, P=.022), had respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) (17.1{\%} compared with 12.2{\%}, P=.001), developed transient tachypnea of the newborn (12.9{\%} compared with 9.8{\%}, P=.020), or required resuscitation in the delivery room (55.8{\%} compared with 49.7{\%}, P=.007). After controlling for confounding factors, we found no significant differences among the groups regarding all of the above outcomes with an odds ratio for RDS of 0.78 (95{\%} confidence interval, 0.60-1.02) and ventilator support of 0.75 (95{\%} confidence interval, 0.55-1.03). CONCLUSION: Exposure to antenatal corticosteroids does not significantly affect respiratory outcomes among those with a subsequent late-preterm birth.",
author = "Cynthia Gyamfi-Bannerman and Sharon Gilbert and Landon, {Mark B.} and Spong, {Catherine Y.} and Rouse, {Dwight J.} and Varner, {Michael W.} and Meis, {Paul J.} and Wapner, {Ronald J.} and Yoram Sorokin and Marshall Carpenter and Peaceman, {Alan M} and O'Sullivan, {Mary J.} and Sibai, {Baha M.} and Thorp, {John M.} and Ramin, {Susan M.} and Mercer, {Brian M.}",
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Gyamfi-Bannerman, C, Gilbert, S, Landon, MB, Spong, CY, Rouse, DJ, Varner, MW, Meis, PJ, Wapner, RJ, Sorokin, Y, Carpenter, M, Peaceman, AM, O'Sullivan, MJ, Sibai, BM, Thorp, JM, Ramin, SM & Mercer, BM 2012, 'Effect of antenatal corticosteroids on respiratory morbidity in singletons after late-preterm birth', Obstetrics and Gynecology, vol. 119, no. 3, pp. 555-559. https://doi.org/10.1097/AOG.0b013e31824758f6

Effect of antenatal corticosteroids on respiratory morbidity in singletons after late-preterm birth. / Gyamfi-Bannerman, Cynthia; Gilbert, Sharon; Landon, Mark B.; Spong, Catherine Y.; Rouse, Dwight J.; Varner, Michael W.; Meis, Paul J.; Wapner, Ronald J.; Sorokin, Yoram; Carpenter, Marshall; Peaceman, Alan M; O'Sullivan, Mary J.; Sibai, Baha M.; Thorp, John M.; Ramin, Susan M.; Mercer, Brian M.

In: Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vol. 119, No. 3, 01.03.2012, p. 555-559.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effect of antenatal corticosteroids on respiratory morbidity in singletons after late-preterm birth

AU - Gyamfi-Bannerman, Cynthia

AU - Gilbert, Sharon

AU - Landon, Mark B.

AU - Spong, Catherine Y.

AU - Rouse, Dwight J.

AU - Varner, Michael W.

AU - Meis, Paul J.

AU - Wapner, Ronald J.

AU - Sorokin, Yoram

AU - Carpenter, Marshall

AU - Peaceman, Alan M

AU - O'Sullivan, Mary J.

AU - Sibai, Baha M.

AU - Thorp, John M.

AU - Ramin, Susan M.

AU - Mercer, Brian M.

PY - 2012/3/1

Y1 - 2012/3/1

N2 - OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether neonates born to women who previously had received antenatal corticosteroids and then delivered a late-preterm-birth neonate had less respiratory morbidity compared with those not exposed to antenatal corticosteroids. METHODS: This is a secondary analysis from a multi-center observational study regarding mode of delivery after previous cesarean delivery. We compared women who received one course of antenatal corticosteroids with unexposed parturients and evaluated various respiratory outcomes among those having a singleton, latepreterm- birth neonate. We controlled for potential confounders including gestational age at delivery, diabetes, mode of delivery, and maternal race. RESULTS: Five thousand nine hundred twenty-four patients met the inclusion criteria; 550 received steroids and 5,374 did not. In the univariable model, compared with unexposed women, those who received antenatal corticosteroids appeared more likely to have neonates who required ventilatory support (11.5% compared with 8.6%, P=.022), had respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) (17.1% compared with 12.2%, P=.001), developed transient tachypnea of the newborn (12.9% compared with 9.8%, P=.020), or required resuscitation in the delivery room (55.8% compared with 49.7%, P=.007). After controlling for confounding factors, we found no significant differences among the groups regarding all of the above outcomes with an odds ratio for RDS of 0.78 (95% confidence interval, 0.60-1.02) and ventilator support of 0.75 (95% confidence interval, 0.55-1.03). CONCLUSION: Exposure to antenatal corticosteroids does not significantly affect respiratory outcomes among those with a subsequent late-preterm birth.

AB - OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether neonates born to women who previously had received antenatal corticosteroids and then delivered a late-preterm-birth neonate had less respiratory morbidity compared with those not exposed to antenatal corticosteroids. METHODS: This is a secondary analysis from a multi-center observational study regarding mode of delivery after previous cesarean delivery. We compared women who received one course of antenatal corticosteroids with unexposed parturients and evaluated various respiratory outcomes among those having a singleton, latepreterm- birth neonate. We controlled for potential confounders including gestational age at delivery, diabetes, mode of delivery, and maternal race. RESULTS: Five thousand nine hundred twenty-four patients met the inclusion criteria; 550 received steroids and 5,374 did not. In the univariable model, compared with unexposed women, those who received antenatal corticosteroids appeared more likely to have neonates who required ventilatory support (11.5% compared with 8.6%, P=.022), had respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) (17.1% compared with 12.2%, P=.001), developed transient tachypnea of the newborn (12.9% compared with 9.8%, P=.020), or required resuscitation in the delivery room (55.8% compared with 49.7%, P=.007). After controlling for confounding factors, we found no significant differences among the groups regarding all of the above outcomes with an odds ratio for RDS of 0.78 (95% confidence interval, 0.60-1.02) and ventilator support of 0.75 (95% confidence interval, 0.55-1.03). CONCLUSION: Exposure to antenatal corticosteroids does not significantly affect respiratory outcomes among those with a subsequent late-preterm birth.

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U2 - 10.1097/AOG.0b013e31824758f6

DO - 10.1097/AOG.0b013e31824758f6

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SP - 555

EP - 559

JO - Obstetrics and Gynecology

JF - Obstetrics and Gynecology

SN - 0029-7844

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ER -