Effect of disease stage on clinical outcome after syngeneic bone marrow transplantation for relapsing experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

Richard K. Burt*, Josette Padilla, Wendy Smith Begolka, Mauro C. Dal Canto, Stephen D. Miller

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

79 Scopus citations

Abstract

Relapsing experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (R-EAE) is an immune-mediated demyelinating central nervous system (CNS) disease. Myeloablation and syngeneic bone marrow transplantation (SBMT), when performed at the peak of acute disease (day 14), prevented glial scarring and ameliorated the disease severity. In contrast, when syngeneic BMT was performed late in chronic phase (day 78), significant glial scarring remained and the clinical severity did not differ significantly from that of the controls. After SBMT in either the acute or chronic phase of disease, the posttransplant immune system remained responsive to myelin epitopes as determined by in vitro proliferation and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) production. However, in mice undergoing SBMT, in vivo delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) responses were significantly decreased while IFN-γ RNA levels and inflammatory infiltrates within the CNS were slightly improved. We conclude that failure of SBMT to improve the clinical disease when performed in chronic phase may be due to preexisting glial scarring. We also conclude that in the absence of glial scarring and irreversible neuronal injury, in vivo DTH responses and histology are better predictors of clinical improvement than in vitro proliferation or IFN-γ cytokine production.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2609-2616
Number of pages8
JournalBlood
Volume91
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 1998

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Immunology
  • Hematology
  • Cell Biology

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