Effect of experimental hyperinsulinemia on sympathetic nervous system activity in the rat

James B. Young*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

52 Scopus citations

Abstract

Since insulin acutely stimulates the sympathetic nervous system, a role for sympathetic overactivity has been hypothesized to underlie the association between chronic hyperinsulinemia and hypertension. To assess the effect of sustained hyperinsulinemia on sympathetic function, [3H]norepinephrine (NE) turnover was measured in rats injected with insulin for 14d. NE turnover in insulin-treated animals given free access to lab chow and a 10% sucrose solution was compared with that obtained in rats fed chow alone or chow plus sucrose. Sucrose ingestion increased NE turnover in heart, brown adipose tissue, and liver, but exogenous insulin did not augment turnover beyond that seen in animals given sucrose alone. This study, therefore, provides no evidence that chronic hyperinsulinemia, sufficient to induce peripheral insulin resistance, stimulates sympathetic activity more than that produced by chronic sucrose ingestion.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)193-200
Number of pages8
JournalLife Sciences
Volume43
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1988

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics(all)

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