Effect of induction chemotherapy on swallow physiology and saliva production in patients with head and neck cancer: A pilot study

Bharat B. Mittal, Barbara Roa Pauloski, Alfred W. Rademaker, Muveddet Discekici-Harris, Irene B. Helenowski, Ann Mellot, Mark Agulnik, Jerilyn A. Logemann*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background No objective data are available to assess the potential damage induction chemotherapy alone contributes to swallowing physiology and salivary production in patients with locally and regionally confined head and neck cancer. Methods Thirteen patients with head and neck cancer were evaluated preinduction and postinduction chemotherapy. Assessment included: (1) percentage of nutrition taken orally and food consistencies in diet; (2) videofluorographic swallow evaluation; (3) whole mouth saliva collection; (4) quality-of-life questionnaire; and (5) pain and oral mucositis scores. Results All patients were able to consume most foods and took 100% of their nutrition orally both preinduction and postinduction chemotherapy. Although a number of swallow measures worsened, no statistically significant differences were observed in diet, quality of life measures, pain, or saliva weight, or in most temporal swallow measures. Pharyngeal residue decreased significantly after chemotherapy. Conclusion Induction chemotherapy alone did not significantly negatively alter swallowing physiology and salivary secretion, although the trend was toward worsening in function.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)567-572
Number of pages6
JournalHead and Neck
Volume37
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2015

Keywords

  • chemotherapy
  • head and neck cancer
  • quality of life
  • saliva
  • swallow physiology
  • videofluorography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Effect of induction chemotherapy on swallow physiology and saliva production in patients with head and neck cancer: A pilot study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this