Effect of Polymer Surface Modification of Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticle Dispersions in High Salinity Environments

Jin Yu, Rikkert J. Nap, Igal Szleifer, Joyce Y. Wong*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Superparamagnetic nanoparticles (SPIONs) can be used as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal enhancement agents for petroleum exploration. This enhancement effect is uniform if SPIONs are monodisperse in size and in composition; yet it is challenging to synthesize monodisperse particles that do not aggregate in high salinity petroleum brine. Here, we report a method to synthesize individual SPIONs coated with tunable surface coating densities of poly(2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic acid (pAMPS) with a catechol end-group (pAMPS*). To establish parameters under which pAMPS*-coated SPIONS do not aggregate, we compared computational predictions with experimental results for variations in pAMPS∗ chain length and surface coverage. Using this combined theoretical and experimental approach, we show that singly dispersed SPIONs remained stabilized in petroleum brine for up to 75 h with high surface density pAMPS*.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)15864-15871
Number of pages8
JournalLangmuir
Volume35
Issue number48
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 3 2019

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Materials Science(all)
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Surfaces and Interfaces
  • Spectroscopy
  • Electrochemistry

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Effect of Polymer Surface Modification of Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticle Dispersions in High Salinity Environments'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this