Effect of pregnancy on renal function in patients with moderate-to- severe diabetic renal insufficiency

Lisa P. Purdy, Richard L. Phelps, Christina E. Hantsch, Sharon L. Dooley, Mark E. Molitch*, Susan H. Hou, Boyd E. Metzger

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

95 Scopus citations

Abstract

OBJECTIVE - Previous studies of patients with diabetic nephropathy and mild renal impairment have suggested no deterioration in renal function as a result of pregnancy. The objective of this study was to determine whether pregnancy may permanently worsen renal function in women with diabetic nephropathy and moderate-to-severe renal insufficiency. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - Eleven patients were identified with diabetic nephropathy and moderate to-severe renal dysfunction (creatinine [Cr] ≤ 124 μmol/l [1.4 mg/dl]) at pregnancy onset by retrospective chart review. Alterations in glomerular filtration rate were estimated by using linear regression of the reciprocal of Cr over time. An equal number of nonpregnant premenopausal type I diabetic women with similar degrees of renal dysfunction served as a comparison group for nonpregnant rate of decline of renal function and potential contributing factors. RESULTS - Mean serum Cr rose from 159 μmol/l (1.8 mg/dl) prepregnancy to 221 μmol/l (2.5 mg/dl) in the third trimester. Renal function was stable in 27%, showed transient worsening in pregnancy in 27%, and demonstrated a permanent decline in 45%. Proteinuria increased in pregnancy in 79%. Exacerbation of hypertension or preeclampsia occurred in 73%. Seven patients progressed to dialysis 6-57 months postpartum, with 71% (five of seven) of these cases attributed to acceleration of disease during the pregnancy. Student's t tests and repeated-measures analysis of variance support a pregnancy-induced acceleration in the rate of decline of renal function. CONCLUSIONS - In this series, patients with diabetic nephropathy and moderate-to-severe renal insufficiency were found to have a >40% chance of accelerated progression of their disease as a result of pregnancy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1067-1074
Number of pages8
JournalDiabetes care
Volume19
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1996

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Advanced and Specialized Nursing

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