Effect of resveratrol onwalking performance in older people with peripheral artery disease the restore randomized clinical trial

Mary M. McDermott*, Christiaan Leeuwenburgh, Jack M. Guralnik, Lu Tian, Robert Sufit, Lihui Zhao, Michael H. Criqui, Melina R. Kibbe, James H. Stein, Donald Lloyd-Jones, Stephen D. Anton, Tamar S. Polonsky, Ying Gao, Rafael De Cabo, Luigi Ferrucci

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

IMPORTANCE Research shows that resveratrol, a sirtuin activator in red wine, improves exercise endurance and skeletal-muscle oxidativemetabolism in animals and may enhance vascular function in humans. Resveratrol supplement sales exceed $30 million annually in the United States, but few data are available regarding its efficacy in humans. OBJECTIVE To determine whether resveratrol, 125mg/d or 500mg/d, improves the 6-minute walk performance in patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD). DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS This parallel-design, double-blind, randomized clinical trial, called Resveratrol to Improve Outcomes in Older People With PAD (RESTORE), was conducted at Northwestern University. Sixty-six participants 65 years or older with PAD were randomized to receive a daily capsule of resveratrol, 125mg or 500mg, or placebo for 6 months. Participants were randomized using a randomly permuted block method stratified by baseline 6-minute walk test performance. This trial was conducted between January 1 2015, and August 5, 2016, and data analyses were performed according to the intention-to-treat concept. INTERVENTIONS Administration of resveratrol, 125 or 500mg/d, or placebo once daily. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES The primary outcome measurewas the change in 6-minute walk distance at the 6-month follow-up. One of the secondary outcomes was change in maximal treadmill walking time. Because of the preliminary nature of the trial, the a priori power calculation used a 1-sided test with a significance level of P < .10. RESULTS The 66 participants were predominantly men (45 [68%]), had a mean (SD) age of 74.4 (6.6) years, and had a mean (SD) ankle brachial index of 0.67 (0.18). Sixty-four (97%) completed follow-up. Six-month mean (SE) changes in 6-minute walk distance were 4.6 (8.1) mfor the 125-mg resveratrol group, -12.8 (7.5)mfor the 500-mg resveratrol group, and -12.3 (7.9)mfor the placebo group (P = .07 for the 125-mg resveratrol group vs placebo; P = .96 for the 500-mg resveratrol group vs placebo). Six-month mean (SE) changes in maximal treadmill walking time were 0.5 (2.3) minutes for the 125-mg resveratrol group, -0.6 (2.1) minutes for the 500-mg resveratrol group, and 0.4 (2.1) minutes for the placebo group (P = .18 for the 125-mg resveratrol group vs placebo; P = .12 for the 500-mg resveratrol group vs placebo). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE The RESTORE trial found no consistent evidence that resveratrol improves walking performance in patients 65 years or older with PAD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)902-907
Number of pages6
JournalJAMA cardiology
Volume2
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2017

    Fingerprint

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

McDermott, M. M., Leeuwenburgh, C., Guralnik, J. M., Tian, L., Sufit, R., Zhao, L., Criqui, M. H., Kibbe, M. R., Stein, J. H., Lloyd-Jones, D., Anton, S. D., Polonsky, T. S., Gao, Y., De Cabo, R., & Ferrucci, L. (2017). Effect of resveratrol onwalking performance in older people with peripheral artery disease the restore randomized clinical trial. JAMA cardiology, 2(8), 902-907. https://doi.org/10.1001/jamacardio.2017.0538