Effect of soy protein on endogenous hormones in postmenopausal women

Victoria W. Persky*, Mary E. Turyk, Ling Wang, Sally Freels, Robert Chatterton, Stephen Barnes, John Erdman, Daniel W. Sepkovic, H. Leon Bradlow, Susan Potter

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

81 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: The long-term clinical ettects of soy protein containing various concentrations of isoflavones on endogenous hormones are unknown. Objective: We examined the effects of ingestion of soy protein containing various concentrations of isoflavones on hormone values in postmenopausal women. Design: Seventy-three hypercholesterolemic, free-living, postmenopausal women participated in a 6-mo double-blind trial in which 40 g protein as part of a National Cholesterol Education Program Step I diet was provided as casein from nonfat dry milk (control), isolated soy protein (ISP) containing 56 mg isoflavones (ISP56), or ISP containing 90 mg isoflavones (ISP90). Endogenous hormone concentrations were measured at baseline and at 3 and 6 mo. Results: The concentration of thyroxine and the free thyroxine index were higher in the ISP56 group, and the concentration of thyroid-stimulating hormone was higher in the ISP90 group than in the control group at 3 and 6 mo (P < 0.05). Triiodothyronine was significantly higher in the ISP90 group only at 6 mo. Thyroxine, free thyroxine index, and thyroid-stimulating hormone at 6 mo were inversely associated with measures of baseline estrogenicity. No significant differences were found for endogenous estrogens, cortisol, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, insulin, glucagon, or follicle-stimulating hormone after baseline hormone values were controlled for. Conclusions: This study does not provide evidence that long-term ingestion of soy protein alters steroid hormone values, but it suggests that soy protein may have small effects on thyroid hormone values that are unlikely to be clinically important. The thyroid effects are, however, consistent with previous findings in animals and highlight the need for future research investigating possible mechanisms of action.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)145-153
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume75
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2002

Keywords

  • Hormones
  • Isoflavones
  • National Cholesterol Education Program Step I diet
  • Postmenopausal women
  • Soy protein

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

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