Effects of a short-term health promotion intervention for a predominantly African-American group of stroke survivors

James H. Rimmer*, Carol Braunschweig, Katie Silverman, Barth Riley, Todd Creviston, Terry Nicola

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

73 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: The study examined the effects of a 12-week health promotion intervention for a predominantly urban African-American population of stroke survivors. Design: A pre-test/post-test lag control group design was employed.Participants/Setting: Participants were 35 stroke survivors (9 male, 26 female) recruited from local area hospitals and clinics. Main Outcome Measures: Biomedical, fitness, nutritional, and psychosocial measures were employed to assess program outcomes. Results: Treatment group made significant gains over lag controls in the following areas: (1) reduced total cholesterol, (2) reduced weight, (3) increased cardiovascular fitness, (4) increased strength, (5) increased flexibility, (6) increased life satisfaction and ability to manage self-care needs, and (7) decreased social isolation. Conclusion: A short-term health promotion intervention for predominantly African-American stroke survivors was effective in improving several physiological and psychological health outcomes. Copyright (C) 2000 American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)332-338
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Preventive Medicine
Volume18
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2000
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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