Effects of an abbreviated obesity intervention supported by mobile technology

The ENGAGED randomized clinical trial

Bonnie Spring*, Christine Ann Pellegrini, Angela Fidler Pfammatter, Jennifer M. Duncan, Alex Pictor, H. Gene McFadden, Juned Siddique, Donald Hedeker

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To determine the effects on weight loss of three abbreviated behavioral weight loss interventions with and without coaching and mobile technology. Methods: A randomized controlled efficacy study of three 6-month weight loss treatments was conducted in 96 adults with obesity: 1) self-guided (SELF), 2) standard (STND), or 3) technology-supported (TECH). STND and TECH received eight in-person group treatment sessions. SELF and STND used paper diaries to self-monitor diet, activity, and weight; TECH used a smartphone application with social networking features and wireless accelerometer. Results: Weight loss was greater for TECH and STND than SELF at 6 months (−5.7 kg [95% confidence interval: −7.2 to −4.1] vs. −2.7 kg [95% confidence interval: −5.1 to −0.3], P < 0.05) but not 12 months. TECH and STND did not differ except that more STND (59%) than TECH (34%) achieved ≥ 5% weight loss at 6 months (P < 0.05). Self-monitoring adherence was greater in TECH than STND (P < 0.001), greater in both interventions than SELF (P < 0.001), and covaried with weight loss (r(84) = 0.36-0.51, P < 0.001). Conclusions: Abbreviated behavioral counseling can produce clinically meaningful weight loss regardless of whether self-monitoring is performed on paper or smartphone, but long-term superiority over standard of care self-guided treatment is challenging to maintain.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1191-1198
Number of pages8
JournalObesity
Volume25
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2017

Fingerprint

Randomized Controlled Trials
Obesity
Weight Loss
Technology
Social Networking
Confidence Intervals
Standard of Care
Counseling
Diet
Weights and Measures

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Endocrinology
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Spring, Bonnie ; Pellegrini, Christine Ann ; Pfammatter, Angela Fidler ; Duncan, Jennifer M. ; Pictor, Alex ; McFadden, H. Gene ; Siddique, Juned ; Hedeker, Donald. / Effects of an abbreviated obesity intervention supported by mobile technology : The ENGAGED randomized clinical trial. In: Obesity. 2017 ; Vol. 25, No. 7. pp. 1191-1198.
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abstract = "Objective: To determine the effects on weight loss of three abbreviated behavioral weight loss interventions with and without coaching and mobile technology. Methods: A randomized controlled efficacy study of three 6-month weight loss treatments was conducted in 96 adults with obesity: 1) self-guided (SELF), 2) standard (STND), or 3) technology-supported (TECH). STND and TECH received eight in-person group treatment sessions. SELF and STND used paper diaries to self-monitor diet, activity, and weight; TECH used a smartphone application with social networking features and wireless accelerometer. Results: Weight loss was greater for TECH and STND than SELF at 6 months (−5.7 kg [95{\%} confidence interval: −7.2 to −4.1] vs. −2.7 kg [95{\%} confidence interval: −5.1 to −0.3], P < 0.05) but not 12 months. TECH and STND did not differ except that more STND (59{\%}) than TECH (34{\%}) achieved ≥ 5{\%} weight loss at 6 months (P < 0.05). Self-monitoring adherence was greater in TECH than STND (P < 0.001), greater in both interventions than SELF (P < 0.001), and covaried with weight loss (r(84) = 0.36-0.51, P < 0.001). Conclusions: Abbreviated behavioral counseling can produce clinically meaningful weight loss regardless of whether self-monitoring is performed on paper or smartphone, but long-term superiority over standard of care self-guided treatment is challenging to maintain.",
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Effects of an abbreviated obesity intervention supported by mobile technology : The ENGAGED randomized clinical trial. / Spring, Bonnie; Pellegrini, Christine Ann; Pfammatter, Angela Fidler; Duncan, Jennifer M.; Pictor, Alex; McFadden, H. Gene; Siddique, Juned; Hedeker, Donald.

In: Obesity, Vol. 25, No. 7, 01.07.2017, p. 1191-1198.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Effects of an abbreviated obesity intervention supported by mobile technology

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AU - Spring, Bonnie

AU - Pellegrini, Christine Ann

AU - Pfammatter, Angela Fidler

AU - Duncan, Jennifer M.

AU - Pictor, Alex

AU - McFadden, H. Gene

AU - Siddique, Juned

AU - Hedeker, Donald

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N2 - Objective: To determine the effects on weight loss of three abbreviated behavioral weight loss interventions with and without coaching and mobile technology. Methods: A randomized controlled efficacy study of three 6-month weight loss treatments was conducted in 96 adults with obesity: 1) self-guided (SELF), 2) standard (STND), or 3) technology-supported (TECH). STND and TECH received eight in-person group treatment sessions. SELF and STND used paper diaries to self-monitor diet, activity, and weight; TECH used a smartphone application with social networking features and wireless accelerometer. Results: Weight loss was greater for TECH and STND than SELF at 6 months (−5.7 kg [95% confidence interval: −7.2 to −4.1] vs. −2.7 kg [95% confidence interval: −5.1 to −0.3], P < 0.05) but not 12 months. TECH and STND did not differ except that more STND (59%) than TECH (34%) achieved ≥ 5% weight loss at 6 months (P < 0.05). Self-monitoring adherence was greater in TECH than STND (P < 0.001), greater in both interventions than SELF (P < 0.001), and covaried with weight loss (r(84) = 0.36-0.51, P < 0.001). Conclusions: Abbreviated behavioral counseling can produce clinically meaningful weight loss regardless of whether self-monitoring is performed on paper or smartphone, but long-term superiority over standard of care self-guided treatment is challenging to maintain.

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