Effects of hypercapnia on the lung

Masahiko Shigemura, Emilia Lecuona, Jacob I Sznajder*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Gases are sensed by lung cells and can activate specific intracellular signalling pathways, and thus have physiological and pathophysiological effects. Carbon dioxide (CO2), a primary product of oxidative metabolism, can be sensed by eukaryotic cells eliciting specific responses via recently identified signalling pathways. However, the physiological and pathophysiological effects of high CO2 (hypercapnia) on the lungs and specific lung cells, which are the primary site of CO2 elimination, are incompletely understood. In this review, we provide a physiological and mechanistic perspective on the effects of hypercapnia on the lungs and discuss the recent understanding of CO2 modulation of the alveolar epithelial function (lung oedema clearance), epithelial cell repair, innate immunity and airway function. (Figure presented.).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2431-2437
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Physiology
Volume595
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 15 2017

Fingerprint

Hypercapnia
Lung
Eukaryotic Cells
Innate Immunity
Carbon Dioxide
Edema
Gases
Epithelial Cells

Keywords

  • airway function
  • alveolar epithelial function
  • carbon dioxide
  • hypercapnia
  • injury and repair
  • innate immunity and host defense

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology

Cite this

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abstract = "Gases are sensed by lung cells and can activate specific intracellular signalling pathways, and thus have physiological and pathophysiological effects. Carbon dioxide (CO2), a primary product of oxidative metabolism, can be sensed by eukaryotic cells eliciting specific responses via recently identified signalling pathways. However, the physiological and pathophysiological effects of high CO2 (hypercapnia) on the lungs and specific lung cells, which are the primary site of CO2 elimination, are incompletely understood. In this review, we provide a physiological and mechanistic perspective on the effects of hypercapnia on the lungs and discuss the recent understanding of CO2 modulation of the alveolar epithelial function (lung oedema clearance), epithelial cell repair, innate immunity and airway function. (Figure presented.).",
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Effects of hypercapnia on the lung. / Shigemura, Masahiko; Lecuona, Emilia; Sznajder, Jacob I.

In: Journal of Physiology, Vol. 595, No. 8, 15.04.2017, p. 2431-2437.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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T1 - Effects of hypercapnia on the lung

AU - Shigemura, Masahiko

AU - Lecuona, Emilia

AU - Sznajder, Jacob I

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N2 - Gases are sensed by lung cells and can activate specific intracellular signalling pathways, and thus have physiological and pathophysiological effects. Carbon dioxide (CO2), a primary product of oxidative metabolism, can be sensed by eukaryotic cells eliciting specific responses via recently identified signalling pathways. However, the physiological and pathophysiological effects of high CO2 (hypercapnia) on the lungs and specific lung cells, which are the primary site of CO2 elimination, are incompletely understood. In this review, we provide a physiological and mechanistic perspective on the effects of hypercapnia on the lungs and discuss the recent understanding of CO2 modulation of the alveolar epithelial function (lung oedema clearance), epithelial cell repair, innate immunity and airway function. (Figure presented.).

AB - Gases are sensed by lung cells and can activate specific intracellular signalling pathways, and thus have physiological and pathophysiological effects. Carbon dioxide (CO2), a primary product of oxidative metabolism, can be sensed by eukaryotic cells eliciting specific responses via recently identified signalling pathways. However, the physiological and pathophysiological effects of high CO2 (hypercapnia) on the lungs and specific lung cells, which are the primary site of CO2 elimination, are incompletely understood. In this review, we provide a physiological and mechanistic perspective on the effects of hypercapnia on the lungs and discuss the recent understanding of CO2 modulation of the alveolar epithelial function (lung oedema clearance), epithelial cell repair, innate immunity and airway function. (Figure presented.).

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KW - injury and repair

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