Effects of low dose and low dose rate low linear energy transfer radiation on animals–review of recent studies relevant for carcinogenesis

Tatjana Paunesku, Aleksandra Stevanović, Jelena Popović, Gayle E. Woloschak*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: Carcinogenic effects of radiation are often assumed to be universally understood, more often than, for example, carcinogenic effects of many different chemicals. This in turn leads to an assumption that any dose of radiation, delivered at any dose rate, poses a serious health challenge. This remains an issue of dispute and low dose radiation research is focused on understanding whether these exposures contribute to cancer incidence. This review is focused on the low linear energy transfer (low LET) radiation exposures for which the data is the most abundant in recent years. Materials and methods: Review of the literature between 2008 and today, highlighting some of the most diverse studies in low dose research. Results: Low dose and low dose rate, low LET ionizing radiation animal studies suggest that the effects of exposure very much depend on animal genotype and health status. Conclusions: Only the integration of all of the data from different models and studies will lead to a fuller understanding of low dose radiation effects. Therefore, we hope to see an increase in international archival efforts and exchange of raw data information opening the possibilities for new types of meta analyses.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalInternational Journal of Radiation Biology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2020

Keywords

  • low dose effects
  • low dose rate
  • low linear energy transfer (low LET)
  • Radiation-induced tumors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

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