Effects of robot-guided passive stretching and active movement training of ankle and mobility impairments in stroke

Genna Waldman, Chung Yong Yang, Yupeng Ren, Lin Liu, Xin Guo, Richard L. Harvey, Elliot J. Roth, Li Qun Zhang*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

34 Scopus citations

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To investigate the effects of controlled passive stretching and active movement training using a portable rehabilitation robot on stroke survivors with ankle and mobility impairment. METHODS: Twenty-four patients at least 3 months post stroke were assigned to receive 6 week training using the portable robot in a research laboratory (robot group) or an instructed exercise program at home (control group). All patients underwent clinical and biomechanical evaluations in the laboratory at pre-evaluation, post-evaluation, and 6-week follow-up. RESULTS: Subjects in the robot group improved significantly more than that in the control group in reduction in spasticity measured by modified Ashworth scale, mobility by Stroke Rehabilitation Assessment of Movement (STREAM), the balance by Berg balance score, dorsiflexion passive range of motion, dorsiflexion strength, and load bearing on the affected limb during gait after 6-week training. Both groups improved in the STREAM, dorsiflexion active range of motion and dorsiflexor strength after the training, which were retained in the follow-up evaluation. CONCLUSION: Robot-assisted passive stretching and active movement training is effective in improving motor function and mobility post stroke.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)625-634
Number of pages10
JournalNeuroRehabilitation
Volume32
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 27 2013

Keywords

  • Stretching
  • movement training
  • rehabilitation
  • robotics
  • stroke

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Rehabilitation
  • Clinical Neurology

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