Effects of visual and proprioceptive motion feedback on human control of targeted movement

Katherine J. Kuchenbecker, Netta Gurari, Allison M. Okamura

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This research seeks to ascertain the relative value of visual and proprioceptive motion feedback during farce-based control of a non-self entity like a powered prosthesis. Accurately controlling such a device is very difficult when the operator cannot see or feel the movement that results from applied forces. As an analogy to prosthesis use, we tested the relative importance of visual and proprioceptive motion feedback during targeted force-based movement. Thirteen human subjects performed a virtual finger-pointing task in which the virtual finger's velocity was always programmed to be directly proportional to the MCP joint torque applied by the subject's right index finger. During successive repetitions of the pointing task, the system conveyed the virtual finger's motion to the user through four combinations of graphical display (vision) and fiuget movement (proprioception). Success rate, speed, and qualitative ease of use Were recorded, and visual motion feedback was found to increase all three performance measures. Proprioceptive motion feedback significantly improved success rate and ease of use, but it yielded slower motions. The results indicate that proprioceptive motion feedback improves human control of targeted movement in both sighted and unsighted conditions, supporting the pursuit of artificial proprioception for prosthetics and underscoring the importance of motion feedback for Other force-controlled human-machine systems, such as interactive virtual environments and teleoperators.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2007 IEEE 10th International Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics, ICORR'07
Pages513-524
Number of pages12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2007
Event2007 IEEE 10th International Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics, ICORR'07 - Noordwijk, Netherlands
Duration: Jun 12 2007Jun 15 2007

Publication series

Name2007 IEEE 10th International Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics, ICORR'07

Other

Other2007 IEEE 10th International Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics, ICORR'07
CountryNetherlands
CityNoordwijk
Period6/12/076/15/07

Fingerprint

Feedback
Man machine systems
Prosthetics
Virtual reality
Torque
Display devices
Prostheses and Implants

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Control and Systems Engineering
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

Cite this

Kuchenbecker, K. J., Gurari, N., & Okamura, A. M. (2007). Effects of visual and proprioceptive motion feedback on human control of targeted movement. In 2007 IEEE 10th International Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics, ICORR'07 (pp. 513-524). [4428474] (2007 IEEE 10th International Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics, ICORR'07). https://doi.org/10.1109/ICORR.2007.4428474
Kuchenbecker, Katherine J. ; Gurari, Netta ; Okamura, Allison M. / Effects of visual and proprioceptive motion feedback on human control of targeted movement. 2007 IEEE 10th International Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics, ICORR'07. 2007. pp. 513-524 (2007 IEEE 10th International Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics, ICORR'07).
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Kuchenbecker, KJ, Gurari, N & Okamura, AM 2007, Effects of visual and proprioceptive motion feedback on human control of targeted movement. in 2007 IEEE 10th International Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics, ICORR'07., 4428474, 2007 IEEE 10th International Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics, ICORR'07, pp. 513-524, 2007 IEEE 10th International Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics, ICORR'07, Noordwijk, Netherlands, 6/12/07. https://doi.org/10.1109/ICORR.2007.4428474

Effects of visual and proprioceptive motion feedback on human control of targeted movement. / Kuchenbecker, Katherine J.; Gurari, Netta; Okamura, Allison M.

2007 IEEE 10th International Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics, ICORR'07. 2007. p. 513-524 4428474 (2007 IEEE 10th International Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics, ICORR'07).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Kuchenbecker KJ, Gurari N, Okamura AM. Effects of visual and proprioceptive motion feedback on human control of targeted movement. In 2007 IEEE 10th International Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics, ICORR'07. 2007. p. 513-524. 4428474. (2007 IEEE 10th International Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics, ICORR'07). https://doi.org/10.1109/ICORR.2007.4428474