Efficient transfer of positrons from a buffer-gas-cooled accumulator into an orthogonally oriented superconducting solenoid for antihydrogen studies

D. Comeau, A. Dror, D. W. Fitzakerley, M. C. George, E. A. Hessels*, C. H. Storry, M. Weel, D. Grzonka, W. Oelert, G. Gabrielse, R. Kalra, W. S. Kolthammer, R. McConnell, P. Richerme, A. Müllers, J. Walz

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Positrons accumulated in a room-temperature buffer-gas-cooled positron accumulator are efficiently transferred into a superconducting solenoid which houses the ATRAP cryogenic Penning trap used in antihydrogen research. The positrons are guided along a 9m long magnetic guide that connects the central field lines of the 0.15 T field in the positron accumulator to the central magnetic field lines of the superconducting solenoid. Seventy independently controllable electromagnets are required to overcome the fringing field of the large-bore superconducting solenoid. The guide includes both a 15° upward bend and a 105° downward bend to account for the orthogonal orientation of the positron accumulator with respect to the cryogenic Penning trap. Low-energy positrons ejected from the accumulator follow the magnetic field lines within the guide and are transferred into the superconducting solenoid with nearly 100% efficiency. A 7m long 5 cm diameter stainless-steel tube and a 20mm long, 1.5mm diameter cryogenic pumping restriction ensure that the 10 -2 mbar pressure in the accumulator is isolated well from the extreme vacuum required in the Penning trap to allow for long antimatter storage times.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number045006
JournalNew Journal of Physics
Volume14
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2012

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

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