Electrospray for digital microfabrication

John A. Rogers*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Electrically driven formation of droplets of conducting fluids combined with electrostatic control of droplet trajectory forms the basis of a method that can be used to print liquids with micron resolution. This talk describes basic aspects of this approach and its use in printing a variety of fluids, including suspensions of single walled carbon nanotubes, solutions of conducting polymers, and range of dielectric materials. Simple devices, such as organic transistors and light emitting diodes, demonstrate some of the patterning capabilities. Advantages and disadvantages compared to conventional ink jet printing will be described.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationDigital Fabrication 2006 - Final Program and Proceedings
Number of pages1
StatePublished - Dec 1 2006
EventDigital Fabrication 2006 - Denver, CO, United States
Duration: Sep 17 2006Sep 22 2006

Publication series

NameDigital Fabrication 2006 - Final Program and Proceedings
Volume2006

Other

OtherDigital Fabrication 2006
CountryUnited States
CityDenver, CO
Period9/17/069/22/06

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

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