Elevated baseline and postdexamethasone cortisol levels. A reflection of severity or endogeneity?

Harvey A. Whiteford*, Cecilia A. Peabody, John G. Csernansky, M. Dhyanne Warner, Philip A. Berger

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study investigated whether elevated baseline and postdexamethasone cortisol levels were more strongly related to severity of depression or presence of endogenous symptoms. In 43 inpatients with major depressive disorder, a positive correlation was found between the total score on the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression and 8.00 a.m. and 4.00 p.m. baseline and 8.00 a.m. and 4.00 p.m. postdexamethasone cortisol levels. Only the 8.00 a.m. postdexamethasone cortisol level was significantly correlated with the number of Research Diagnostic Criteria (RDC) endogenous items present. Despite a statistically significant relationship between severity and endogeneity, our results suggest elevated baseline and postdexamethasone cortisol levels may be more closely related to severity of depression, rather than the presence of a cluster of symptoms referred to as endogenous.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)199-202
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Affective Disorders
Volume12
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1987

Keywords

  • Baseline cortisol
  • Dexamethasone suppression test (DST)
  • Endogeneity
  • Severity of depression

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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