Emotion assessment using the NIH Toolbox.

John M. Salsman*, Zeeshan Butt, Paul A. Pilkonis, Jill M. Cyranowski, Nicholas Zill, Hugh C. Hendrie, Mary Jo Kupst, Morgen A R Kelly, Rita K. Bode, Seung W. Choi, Jin Shei Lai, James W. Griffith, Catherine M. Stoney, Pim Brouwers, Sarah S. Knox, David Cella

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

One of the goals of the NIH Toolbox for Assessment of Neurological and Behavioral Function was to identify or develop brief measures of emotion for use in prospective epidemiologic and clinical research. Emotional health has significant links to physical health and exerts a powerful effect on perceptions of life quality. Based on an extensive literature review and expert input, the Emotion team identified 4 central subdomains: Negative Affect, Psychological Well-Being, Stress and Self-Efficacy, and Social Relationships. A subsequent psychometric review identified several existing self-report and proxy measures of these subdomains with measurement characteristics that met the NIH Toolbox criteria. In cases where adequate measures did not exist, robust item banks were developed to assess concepts of interest. A population-weighted sample was recruited by an online survey panel to provide initial item calibration and measure validation data. Participants aged 8 to 85 years completed self-report measures whereas parents/guardians responded for children aged 3 to 12 years. Data were analyzed using a combination of classic test theory and item response theory methods, yielding efficient measures of emotional health concepts. An overview of the development of the NIH Toolbox Emotion battery is presented along with preliminary results. Norming activities led to further refinement of the battery, thus enhancing the robustness of emotional health measurement for researchers using the NIH Toolbox.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalUnknown Journal
Volume80
Issue number11 Suppl 3
StatePublished - Jan 1 2013

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Emotions
Health
Self Report
Proxy
Self Efficacy
Psychometrics
Calibration
Parents
Quality of Life
Research Personnel
Psychology
Research
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Salsman, J. M., Butt, Z., Pilkonis, P. A., Cyranowski, J. M., Zill, N., Hendrie, H. C., ... Cella, D. (2013). Emotion assessment using the NIH Toolbox. Unknown Journal, 80(11 Suppl 3).
Salsman, John M. ; Butt, Zeeshan ; Pilkonis, Paul A. ; Cyranowski, Jill M. ; Zill, Nicholas ; Hendrie, Hugh C. ; Kupst, Mary Jo ; Kelly, Morgen A R ; Bode, Rita K. ; Choi, Seung W. ; Lai, Jin Shei ; Griffith, James W. ; Stoney, Catherine M. ; Brouwers, Pim ; Knox, Sarah S. ; Cella, David. / Emotion assessment using the NIH Toolbox. In: Unknown Journal. 2013 ; Vol. 80, No. 11 Suppl 3.
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Salsman, JM, Butt, Z, Pilkonis, PA, Cyranowski, JM, Zill, N, Hendrie, HC, Kupst, MJ, Kelly, MAR, Bode, RK, Choi, SW, Lai, JS, Griffith, JW, Stoney, CM, Brouwers, P, Knox, SS & Cella, D 2013, 'Emotion assessment using the NIH Toolbox.', Unknown Journal, vol. 80, no. 11 Suppl 3.

Emotion assessment using the NIH Toolbox. / Salsman, John M.; Butt, Zeeshan; Pilkonis, Paul A.; Cyranowski, Jill M.; Zill, Nicholas; Hendrie, Hugh C.; Kupst, Mary Jo; Kelly, Morgen A R; Bode, Rita K.; Choi, Seung W.; Lai, Jin Shei; Griffith, James W.; Stoney, Catherine M.; Brouwers, Pim; Knox, Sarah S.; Cella, David.

In: Unknown Journal, Vol. 80, No. 11 Suppl 3, 01.01.2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Choi, Seung W.

AU - Lai, Jin Shei

AU - Griffith, James W.

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AU - Knox, Sarah S.

AU - Cella, David

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Salsman JM, Butt Z, Pilkonis PA, Cyranowski JM, Zill N, Hendrie HC et al. Emotion assessment using the NIH Toolbox. Unknown Journal. 2013 Jan 1;80(11 Suppl 3).