Employing Perceptual-Learning Research in Journalism and Communication: Immediate and delayed effects of a perceptual-learning module on AP editing accuracy

Justin David Martin*, S. Shageaa Naqvi, George Anghelcev

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Perceptual-learning methods teach concepts and skills using numerous, rapid-fire questions and immediate visual feedback. A quasi-experiment compared a digital perceptual-learning module (PLM) of 200 multiple choice questions on Associated Press style to an introductory journalism/strategic communication course in which students learned AP style. The PLM, which took only 70 min, significantly improved participants’ declarative and procedural knowledge of AP, and PLM participants outperformed classroom/control participants on AP editing accuracy. A delayed posttest seven weeks after initial posttest showed no decrement in AP editing accuracy among PLM participants. This is one of the first experiments testing perceptual-learning methods in journalism or communication.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1491-1509
Number of pages19
JournalJournalism Studies
Volume20
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 27 2019

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journalism
communication
Communication
learning method
learning
Fires
Experiments
Students
Feedback
experiment
Testing
classroom
student

Keywords

  • AP style
  • PLM
  • Perceptual learning
  • copy editing
  • grammar
  • journalism
  • strategic communication

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Communication

Cite this

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