Encoding of distributional regularities independent of markedness: Evidence from unimpaired speakers

Matthew Goldrick*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Romani, Galuzzi, Guariglia, and Goslin (Comparing phoneme frequency, age of acquisition and loss in aphasia: Implications for phonological universals. Cognitive Neuropsychology) used speech error data from individuals with acquired impairments to argue that independent from articulatory complexity, within-language distributional regularities influence the processing of sound structure in speech production. Converging evidence from unimpaired speakers is reviewed, focusing on speech errors in language production. Future research should examine how articulatory and frequency factors are integrated in language processing.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)476-481
Number of pages6
JournalCognitive Neuropsychology
Volume34
Issue number7-8
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 17 2017

Keywords

  • Frequency
  • implicit learning
  • markedness
  • phonotactics
  • speech errors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Cognitive Neuroscience

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