Engaging hospitalists in antimicrobial stewardship: Lessons from a multihospital collaborative

Megan R. Mack*, Jeffrey M. Rohde, Diane Jacobsen, James R. Barron, Christin H Ko, Michael Goonewardene, David J. Rosenberg, Arjun Srinivasan, Scott A. Flanders

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Inappropriate antimicrobial use in hospitalized patients contributes to antimicrobial-resistant infections and complications. We sought to evaluate the impact, barriers, and facilitators of antimicrobial stewardship best practices in a diverse group of hospital medicine programs. This multihospital initiative included 1 community nonteaching hospital, 2 community teaching hospitals, and 2 academic medical centers participating in a collaborative with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Institute for Healthcare Improvement. We conducted multimodal physician education on best practices for antimicrobial use including: (1) enhanced antimicrobial documentation, (2) improved quality and accessibility of local clinical guidelines, and (3) a 72-hour antimicrobial “timeout.” Implementation barriers included variability in physician practice styles, lack of awareness of stewardship importance, and overly broad interventions. Facilitators included engaging hospitalists, collecting real time data and providing performance feedback, and appropriately limiting the scope of interventions. In 2 hospitals, complete antimicrobial documentation in sampled medical records improved significantly (4% to 51% and 8% to 65%, P < 0.001 for each comparison). A total of 726 antimicrobial timeouts occurred at 4 hospitals, and 30% resulted in optimization or discontinuation of antimicrobials. With careful attention to key barriers and facilitators, hospitalists can successfully implement effective antimicrobial stewardship practices. Journal of Hospital Medicine 2016;11:576–580.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)576-580
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of hospital medicine
Volume11
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2016

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Hospitalists
Hospital Medicine
Community Hospital
Practice Guidelines
Documentation
Physicians
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)
Teaching Hospitals
Medical Records
Guidelines
Delivery of Health Care
Education
Infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Leadership and Management
  • Fundamentals and skills
  • Health Policy
  • Care Planning
  • Assessment and Diagnosis

Cite this

Mack, M. R., Rohde, J. M., Jacobsen, D., Barron, J. R., Ko, C. H., Goonewardene, M., ... Flanders, S. A. (2016). Engaging hospitalists in antimicrobial stewardship: Lessons from a multihospital collaborative. Journal of hospital medicine, 11(8), 576-580. https://doi.org/10.1002/jhm.2599
Mack, Megan R. ; Rohde, Jeffrey M. ; Jacobsen, Diane ; Barron, James R. ; Ko, Christin H ; Goonewardene, Michael ; Rosenberg, David J. ; Srinivasan, Arjun ; Flanders, Scott A. / Engaging hospitalists in antimicrobial stewardship : Lessons from a multihospital collaborative. In: Journal of hospital medicine. 2016 ; Vol. 11, No. 8. pp. 576-580.
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Mack, MR, Rohde, JM, Jacobsen, D, Barron, JR, Ko, CH, Goonewardene, M, Rosenberg, DJ, Srinivasan, A & Flanders, SA 2016, 'Engaging hospitalists in antimicrobial stewardship: Lessons from a multihospital collaborative', Journal of hospital medicine, vol. 11, no. 8, pp. 576-580. https://doi.org/10.1002/jhm.2599

Engaging hospitalists in antimicrobial stewardship : Lessons from a multihospital collaborative. / Mack, Megan R.; Rohde, Jeffrey M.; Jacobsen, Diane; Barron, James R.; Ko, Christin H; Goonewardene, Michael; Rosenberg, David J.; Srinivasan, Arjun; Flanders, Scott A.

In: Journal of hospital medicine, Vol. 11, No. 8, 01.08.2016, p. 576-580.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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