Engineering student identities in the navigation of the undergraduate curriculum

Reed Stevens*, Kevin O'Connor, Lari Garrison

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

51 Scopus citations

Abstract

Recent educational theory emphasizes the importance of considering identity processes in studying learning and development. In engineering education, identity has been cited as central in student development, for example, as a key factor in retention of students in the discipline. This paper examines how identity relates to students' decisions about whether to remain in or switch out of engineering majors. We develop case studies of two students, both women and both members of underrepresented minority groups. One successfully gained admittance into her desired major, and one is considering leaving engineering. We argue that while each woman takes a different position on what engineering education should offer, both display a common, and we argue troubling, view of this educational experience. Our analysis seeks to explicate our ethnographic methods and to explore the broader possible significance for engineering education of the views that these women hold.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication2005 ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition, Conference Proceedings
Pages5529-5536
Number of pages8
StatePublished - 2005
Event2005 ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition: The Changing Landscape of Engineering and Technology Education in a Global World - Portland, OR, United States
Duration: Jun 12 2005Jun 15 2005

Other

Other2005 ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition: The Changing Landscape of Engineering and Technology Education in a Global World
CountryUnited States
CityPortland, OR
Period6/12/056/15/05

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

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