Environment discrimination with vibration feedback to the foot, arm, and fingertip

Netta Gurari, Kathryn Smith, Manu Madhav, Allison M. Okamura

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Haptic feedback for upper-limb prostheses is desirable to enable a user to interact naturally with his or her environment, including operating the limb without vision and performing activities of daily living. We present a noninvasive method of providing one type of haptic feedback, vibration, to an upper-limb prosthesis user to enable discrimination of environment properties. Using a telemanipulation system that emulates an ideal prosthesis, able-bodied subjects tapped on materials of varying stiffness while vibration signals were recorded using an accelerometer. The vibrations were displayed in real time to the user through a C2 tactor mounted on the fingertip, foot, or upper arm. A three-alternative forced choice experiment was conducted, in which pairs of materials were presented. The subjects identified the stiffer surface or stated that they were of equal stiffness. Differing visual and force cues among the materials were eliminated through the use of the teleoperator and a graphical display. Results for five users indicate that vibration feedback to the foot enables environment discrimination comparable to that of the fingertip, and that the foot is better than the upper arm. The foot is a promising location for haptic feedback because of its sensitivity to haptic stimuli and the convenience of placing small devices and power sources within the shoe.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2009 IEEE International Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics, ICORR 2009
Pages343-348
Number of pages6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 17 2009
Event2009 IEEE International Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics, ICORR 2009 - Kyoto, Japan
Duration: Jun 23 2009Jun 26 2009

Publication series

Name2009 IEEE International Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics, ICORR 2009

Other

Other2009 IEEE International Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics, ICORR 2009
CountryJapan
CityKyoto
Period6/23/096/26/09

Fingerprint

Feedback
Stiffness
Prosthetics
Accelerometers
Display devices
Experiments
Prostheses and Implants

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

Cite this

Gurari, N., Smith, K., Madhav, M., & Okamura, A. M. (2009). Environment discrimination with vibration feedback to the foot, arm, and fingertip. In 2009 IEEE International Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics, ICORR 2009 (pp. 343-348). [5209508] (2009 IEEE International Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics, ICORR 2009). https://doi.org/10.1109/ICORR.2009.5209508
Gurari, Netta ; Smith, Kathryn ; Madhav, Manu ; Okamura, Allison M. / Environment discrimination with vibration feedback to the foot, arm, and fingertip. 2009 IEEE International Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics, ICORR 2009. 2009. pp. 343-348 (2009 IEEE International Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics, ICORR 2009).
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Gurari, N, Smith, K, Madhav, M & Okamura, AM 2009, Environment discrimination with vibration feedback to the foot, arm, and fingertip. in 2009 IEEE International Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics, ICORR 2009., 5209508, 2009 IEEE International Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics, ICORR 2009, pp. 343-348, 2009 IEEE International Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics, ICORR 2009, Kyoto, Japan, 6/23/09. https://doi.org/10.1109/ICORR.2009.5209508

Environment discrimination with vibration feedback to the foot, arm, and fingertip. / Gurari, Netta; Smith, Kathryn; Madhav, Manu; Okamura, Allison M.

2009 IEEE International Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics, ICORR 2009. 2009. p. 343-348 5209508 (2009 IEEE International Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics, ICORR 2009).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Gurari N, Smith K, Madhav M, Okamura AM. Environment discrimination with vibration feedback to the foot, arm, and fingertip. In 2009 IEEE International Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics, ICORR 2009. 2009. p. 343-348. 5209508. (2009 IEEE International Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics, ICORR 2009). https://doi.org/10.1109/ICORR.2009.5209508