Epidemiology of acute kidney injury in critically Ill children and young adults

Ahmad Kaddourah, Rajit K. Basu, Sean M. Bagshaw, Stuart L. Goldstein*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

660 Scopus citations

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The epidemiologic characteristics of children and young adults with acute kidney injury have been described in single-center and retrospective studies. We conducted a multinational, prospective study involving patients admitted to pediatric intensive care units to define the incremental risk of death and complications associated with severe acute kidney injury. METHODS: We used the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes criteria to define acute kidney injury. Severe acute kidney injury was defined as stage 2 or 3 acute kidney injury (plasma creatinine level ≥2 times the baseline level or urine output <0.5 ml per kilogram of body weight per hour for ≥12 hours) and was assessed for the first 7 days of intensive care. All patients 3 months to 25 years of age who were admitted to 1 of 32 participating units were screened during 3 consecutive months. The primary outcome was 28-day mortality. RESULTS: A total of 4683 patients were evaluated; acute kidney injury developed in 1261 patients (26.9%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 25.6 to 28.2), and severe acute kidney injury developed in 543 patients (11.6%; 95% CI, 10.7 to 12.5). Severe acute kidney injury conferred an increased risk of death by day 28 after adjustment for 16 covariates (adjusted odds ratio, 1.77; 95% CI, 1.17 to 2.68); death occurred in 60 of the 543 patients (11.0%) with severe acute kidney injury versus 105 of the 4140 patients (2.5%) without severe acute kidney injury (P<0.001). Severe acute kidney injury was associated with increased use of mechanical ventilation and renal-replacement therapy. A stepwise increase in 28-day mortality was associated with worsening severity of acute kidney injury (P<0.001 by log-rank test). Assessment of acute kidney injury according to the plasma creatinine level alone failed to identify acute kidney injury in 67.2% of the patients with low urine output. CONCLUSIONS: Acute kidney injury is common and is associated with poor outcomes, including increased mortality, among critically ill children and young adults.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)11-20
Number of pages10
JournalNew England Journal of Medicine
Volume376
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 5 2017

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Epidemiology of acute kidney injury in critically Ill children and young adults'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this