Ethnic Identity, Acculturation, and 12-Month Psychiatric Service Utilization Among Black and Hispanic Adults in the U.S

Inger E Burnett-Zeigler*, Yuri Lee, Kipling M. Bohnert

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

A cross-sectional study design was used to examine the associations of ethnic identity, acculturation, and psychiatric service utilization among Wave 2 respondents of the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol Related Conditions with 12-month psychiatric disorders who self-identified as Black (6587, 19%) and Hispanic (6359, 18%). Weighted multivariable regression analyses were conducted to examine the relationships between ethnic identity, acculturation, and 12-month psychiatric service utilization. Stronger ethnic identity was associated with decreased odds of using psychiatric services among Black (AOR = 0.956; CI = 0.923–0.991) and Hispanic individuals (AOR = 0.967; CI = 0.945–0.990). Greater acculturation was associated with an increased odds of psychiatric service utilization for Hispanic individuals (AOR = 1.025; CI = 1.000–1.050). These findings suggest that a sense of pride, belonging, and attachment to one’s racial/ethnic group and participating in ethnic behaviors is associated with lower rates of participation in psychiatric services; alternatively, acquiring key elements of the U.S. culture is associated with greater participation in psychiatric services.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)13-30
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Behavioral Health Services and Research
Volume45
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

Fingerprint

Acculturation
acculturation
ethnic identity
Hispanic Americans
Psychiatry
utilization
participation
cross-sectional study
Ethnic Groups
ethnic group
alcohol
Cross-Sectional Studies
regression
Regression Analysis
Alcohols

Keywords

  • Acculturation
  • Ethnic identity
  • Psychiatry
  • Race/ethnicity
  • Service utilization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

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title = "Ethnic Identity, Acculturation, and 12-Month Psychiatric Service Utilization Among Black and Hispanic Adults in the U.S",
abstract = "A cross-sectional study design was used to examine the associations of ethnic identity, acculturation, and psychiatric service utilization among Wave 2 respondents of the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol Related Conditions with 12-month psychiatric disorders who self-identified as Black (6587, 19{\%}) and Hispanic (6359, 18{\%}). Weighted multivariable regression analyses were conducted to examine the relationships between ethnic identity, acculturation, and 12-month psychiatric service utilization. Stronger ethnic identity was associated with decreased odds of using psychiatric services among Black (AOR = 0.956; CI = 0.923–0.991) and Hispanic individuals (AOR = 0.967; CI = 0.945–0.990). Greater acculturation was associated with an increased odds of psychiatric service utilization for Hispanic individuals (AOR = 1.025; CI = 1.000–1.050). These findings suggest that a sense of pride, belonging, and attachment to one’s racial/ethnic group and participating in ethnic behaviors is associated with lower rates of participation in psychiatric services; alternatively, acquiring key elements of the U.S. culture is associated with greater participation in psychiatric services.",
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Ethnic Identity, Acculturation, and 12-Month Psychiatric Service Utilization Among Black and Hispanic Adults in the U.S. / Burnett-Zeigler, Inger E; Lee, Yuri; Bohnert, Kipling M.

In: Journal of Behavioral Health Services and Research, Vol. 45, No. 1, 01.01.2018, p. 13-30.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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