Evaluating Consumer Protection Programs

Part I. Weak But Commonly Used Research Designs

LYNN W. PHILLIPS*, Bobby Calder

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this two‐part article, current methodological approaches to the evaluation of consumer protection reforms are critically reviewed. In Part I, three quasi‐experimental research designs commonly used to evaluate consumer protection initiatives are examined. It is shown that these designs are inherently incapable of yielding strong conclusions about the effects of a law or regulation. In Part II, which will be published in the next issue, research designs which allow stronger causal inferences about the effects of a reform proposal are reviewed. Implications of the review are then discussed in terms of future public policy and evaluation research in the consumer protection area.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)157-185
Number of pages29
JournalJournal of Consumer Affairs
Volume13
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1979

Fingerprint

consumer protection
research planning
reform
evaluation research
public policy
regulation
Law
evaluation
Consumer protection
Research design

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Economics, Econometrics and Finance(all)

Cite this

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title = "Evaluating Consumer Protection Programs: Part I. Weak But Commonly Used Research Designs",
abstract = "In this two‐part article, current methodological approaches to the evaluation of consumer protection reforms are critically reviewed. In Part I, three quasi‐experimental research designs commonly used to evaluate consumer protection initiatives are examined. It is shown that these designs are inherently incapable of yielding strong conclusions about the effects of a law or regulation. In Part II, which will be published in the next issue, research designs which allow stronger causal inferences about the effects of a reform proposal are reviewed. Implications of the review are then discussed in terms of future public policy and evaluation research in the consumer protection area.",
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Evaluating Consumer Protection Programs : Part I. Weak But Commonly Used Research Designs. / PHILLIPS, LYNN W.; Calder, Bobby.

In: Journal of Consumer Affairs, Vol. 13, No. 2, 01.01.1979, p. 157-185.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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