Evaluating Internet and Scholarly Sources across the Disciplines: Two Case Studies

Susanna C Calkins, Matthew R Kelley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

Although most college faculty expect their students to analyze Internet and scholarly sources in a critical and responsible manner, recent research suggests that many undergraduates are unable to discriminate between credible and noncredible sources, in part because they lack the proper training and relevant experiences. The authors describe two case studies from different disciplines (psychology and history) that offer a variety of strategies instructors can use to hep students learn to critically evaluate and analyze Internet and scholarly sources.
Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)151-156
Number of pages6
JournalCollege Teaching
Volume55
Issue number4
StatePublished - 2007

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