Evaluating the impact of spatio-temporal demand forecast aggregation on the operational performance of shared autonomous mobility fleets

Florian Dandl, Michael Hyland, Klaus Bogenberger, Hani S. Mahmassani*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

Fleet operators rely on forecasts of future user requests to reposition empty vehicles and efficiently operate their vehicle fleets. In the context of an on-demand shared-use autonomous vehicle (AV) mobility service (SAMS), this study analyzes the trade-off that arises when selecting a spatio-temporal demand forecast aggregation level to support the operation of a SAMS fleet. In general, when short-term forecasts of user requests are intended for a finer space–time discretization, they tend to become less reliable. However, holding reliability constant, more disaggregate forecasts provide more valuable information to fleet operators. To explore this trade-off, this study presents a flexible methodological framework to evaluate and quantify the impact of spatio-temporal demand forecast aggregation on the operational efficiency of a SAMS fleet. At the core of the methodological framework is an agent-based simulation that requires a demand forecasting method and a SAMS fleet operational strategy. This study employs an offline demand forecasting method, and an online joint AV-user assignment and empty AV repositioning strategy. Using this forecasting method and fleet operational strategy, as well as Manhattan, NY taxi data, this study simulates the operations of a SAMS fleet across various spatio-temporal aggregation levels. Results indicate that as demand forecasts (and subregions) become more spatially disaggregate, fleet performance improves, in terms of user wait time and empty fleet miles. This finding comes despite demand forecast quality decreasing as subregions become more spatially disaggregate. Additionally, results indicate the SAMS fleet significantly benefits from higher quality demand forecasts, especially at more disaggregate levels.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1975-1996
Number of pages22
JournalTransportation
Volume46
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2019

Keywords

  • Autonomous mobility on-demand
  • Autonomous vehicles
  • Demand forecasting
  • Fleet operations
  • Mobility service

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Civil and Structural Engineering
  • Development
  • Transportation

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