Evaluation of multiple drug therapy in human immunodeficiency virus-infected pediatric patients

Jennifer R. King, Edward P. Acosta, Ellen Chadwick, Ram Yogev, Marilyn Crain, Robert Pass, David W. Kimberlin, Marsha S. Sturdevant, Grace M. Aldrovandi*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background. An aggressive therapeutic approach for treatment of HIV in adults consists of combining five or more concurrent antiretrovirals. The clinical benefits of this regimen are often accompanied by increased toxicities. We report the safety and tolerance of multiple drug therapy in HIV-infected children. Methods. A retrospective chart review was performed to identify HIV-infected children who received ≥5 concurrent antiretrovirals or 4 antiretrovirals plus hydroxyurea. Treatment success was defined as ≥1 log 10 decrease in plasma HIV RNA from baseline any time during multiple drug therapy. Toxicities were defined as a >Grade 2 change from baseline in laboratory values. Results. Twelve patients received multiple drug therapy for 6 months, and 42% of patients continued to receive therapy for at least 1 year. No Grade 3 or 4 toxicities or laboratory abnormalities were reported. Treatment success occurred in 8 (83%) of 12 patients. Adherence was a determining factor in treatment success or failure. Conclusions. Treatment of HIV-infected children with multiple drug therapy was well-tolerated in this cohort. Treatment success occurred in most patients, with adherence affecting patients' likelihood of success. Larger controlled clinical trials in this patient population are necessary to determine whether the benefit of this therapeutic approach outweighs potential risks.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)239-244
Number of pages6
JournalPediatric Infectious Disease Journal
Volume22
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2003

Keywords

  • Antiretroviral toxicities
  • Highly active antiretroviral therapy
  • Human immunodeficiency virus
  • Multiple drug therapy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

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