Everyday Acts of Resistance: Mexican, Undocumented Immigrant Children and Adolescents Navigating Oppression With Mentor Support

Bernadette Sánchez*, Yesenia Garcia-Murillo, Lidia Y. Monjaras-Gaytan, Kay Thursby, Grevelin Ulerio, Wendy de los Reyes, Ida R. Salusky, Claudio S. Rivera

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Study aims were to examine oppression in education among Mexican immigrant youth with undocumented status and how mentors and other adults helped them resist oppression. Qualitative, narrative one-on-one interviews were conducted with 17 Mexican immigrant young adults with undocumented or DACA status in the U.S. Participants provided retrospective accounts from childhood through older adolescence. Analyses revealed critical junctures in which participants experienced oppression: (1) developmental milestones and school events, (2) college application process, (3) unforeseen life events, and (4) incidents of racial discrimination. Mentors and other adults helped participants to resist oppression through advocacy, social capital efforts, role modeling, and emotional, instrumental, and financial support. This study fills gaps in the literature on mentoring and immigrant youth who are undocumented.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Research on Adolescence
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022

Keywords

  • adolescents
  • education
  • Latinx/Latino
  • mentoring
  • mexican
  • oppression
  • undocumented immigrants

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cultural Studies
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

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