Evidence for abnormal regulation of circulating 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis and normal calcium metabolism

Sol Epstein, Paula H Stern, Norman H. Bell*, Ian Dowdeswell, Russell T. Turner

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

26 Scopus citations

Abstract

Available evidence indicates that hypercalcemia in pulmonary tuberculosis results from increases in circulating 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1α,25(OH)2D]. To further characterize vitamin D metabolism in this disorder, the effects of vitamin D, 100,000 units a day for 4 days, were compared in 25 normal subjects and 11 patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis who were normocalcemic and had not had hypercalcemia. Serum calcium, phosphorus, 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OHD) and 1α,25(OH)2D were measured. Whereas vitamin D increased mean serum 25-OHD from 20±2 (±SE) to 40±5 ng/ml (P<0.001) and did not change mean serum 1α,25(OH)2D in the normals (33±2 vs. 31±2 pg/ml), it increased mean serum 25-OHD from 21±4 to 55±13 ng/ml (P<0.05) and mean serum 1α,25(OH)2D from 28±2 to 35±3 pg/ml (P<0.05) in the patients. Serum calcium was normal and remained within the normal range in all subjects and patients. The findings indicate that there is a modest but significant abnormality in the regulation of circulating 1α,25(OH)2D in normocalcemic patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. The results are similar to those previously reported by us in normocalcemic patients with sarcoidosis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)541-544
Number of pages4
JournalCalcified Tissue International
Volume36
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 1984

Keywords

  • 1α25(OH)D
  • Hypercalcemia
  • Normocalcemia
  • Pulmonary tuberculosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Endocrinology

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