Evidence for the coidentification of GAP-43, a growth-associated protein, and F1, a plasticity-associated protein

G. J. Snipes, S. Y. Chan, C. B. McGuire, B. R. Costello, J. J. Norden, J. A. Freeman, A. Routtenberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

57 Scopus citations

Abstract

GAP-43 is a fast-axonally transported protein whose expression correlates with periods of axon growth both during development and during regeneration. Similarities in molecular weight (43-47 kDa), pl (4.3-4.5), and aberrant behavior in acrylamide gels suggested that GAP-43 might be related or identical to protein F1, a protein kinase C substrate that has been shown to undergo a change in phosphorylation state during long-term potentiation in the hippocampus. Here we show that GAP-43 and protein F1 comigrate by two-dimensional PAGE and that antiserum raised against GAP-43 specifically immunoprecipitates protein F1. More direct evidence that GAP-43 and protein F1 are identical proteins was obtained by performing S. aureus V8 protease digests of a mixture of purified 32P-labeled protein F1 and purified GAP-43. Under these conditions, 2 phosphorylated peptide fragments of protein F1 corresponded exactly to 2 Coomassie-stainable bands from purified GAP-43. We conclude on the basis of these data that GAP-43 and protein F1 are identical proteins. Using light-microscopic immunocytochemistry, we also show that GAP-43/protein F1 immunoreactivity is localized to neuropil areas of the hippocampus consistent with its roles as a protein kinase C substrate in vivo and in long-term potentiation. These findings suggest that nerve growth during development and regeneration, and synaptic plasticity in the adult mammalian brain, may be mediated by a common mechanism involving the phosphorylation of GAP-43/protein F1.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)4066-4075
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Neuroscience
Volume7
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - 1987

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

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