Evidence suggesting superiority of visual (verbal) vs. auditory test presentation modality in the P300-based, Complex Trial Protocol for concealed autobiographical memory detection

J. Peter Rosenfeld*, Anne Ward, Vincent Frigo, Jesse Drapekin, Elena Labkovsky

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

18 Scopus citations

Abstract

One group of participants received a series of city name stimuli presented on trials of the Complex Trial Protocol (CTP) version of a P300-based, concealed information test (CIT). Stimuli were presented on alternating trials in either auditory or visual presentation modality. In 1/7 of the trials the participant's home town (probe) repeatedly appeared in a series of 6 other (irrelevant) repeated city names. In both modalities, probe stimuli produced larger P300s than irrelevant stimuli. Visual stimuli produced shorter behavioral reaction times and P300 latencies, as well as larger P300 probe amplitudes, probe-irrelevant amplitude differences, and individual diagnostic accuracies than the same stimuli presented in the auditory modality. Possible reasons for these effects are discussed, and subject to discussed limitations, the applied conclusion reached is that in all CITs, visual presentation of stimuli, if feasible, should be preferentially used.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)16-22
Number of pages7
JournalInternational Journal of Psychophysiology
Volume96
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2015

Keywords

  • Concealed information tests
  • Credibility assessment
  • Event-related potentials
  • Guilty knowledge tests
  • Lie detection
  • Memory detection
  • P300
  • Psychophysiological detection of deception
  • Visual modality superiority

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Physiology (medical)

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