Excitotoxicity and dopaminergic dysfunction in the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome dementia complex: Therapeutic implications

Karl D. Kieburtz*, Leon Gary Epstein, Harris A. Gelbard, J. Timothy Greenamyre

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

65 Scopus citations

Abstract

Human immunodeficiency virus infection is frequently complicated by a syndrome of central nervous system dysfunction known as the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome dementia complex (ADC). The ADC is characterized by abnormalities in cognition, motor performance, and behavior, and it produces serious morbidity in a significant number of patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. The pathogenesis of ADC is unclear, but appears to be caused by the human immunodeficiency virus itself, rather than by a secondary opportunistic process. Herein, we review the data regarding the pathogenesis of ADC and hypothesize a mechanism involving excitotoxicity and dopaminergic dysfunction. N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists may be of therapeutic benefit, as these agents may both limit glutamate-mediated neuronal dysfunction and improve dopaminergic neuronal function.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1281-1284
Number of pages4
JournalArchives of Neurology
Volume48
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1991

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Clinical Neurology

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