Executive self, self-esteem, and negative affectivity: Relations at the phenotypic and genotypic level

Michelle B. Neiss*, Jim Stevenson, Constantine Sedikides, Madoka Kumashiro, Eli J. Finkel, Caryl E. Rusbult

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

30 Scopus citations

Abstract

Complementary approaches examined the relations among executive self, self-esteem, and negative affectivity. A cross-sectional (N = 4,242) and a longitudinal (N = 158) study established that self-esteem mediated the relation between executive self and negative affectivity. A 3rd study (N = 878 twin pairs) replicated this pattern and examined genetic and environmental influences underlying all 3 phenotypes. Covariation among the 3 phenotypes reflected largely common genetic influences, although unique genetic effects explained variability in both executive self and negative affectivity. Executive self was influenced by shared environmental influences unique from those affecting self-esteem and negative affectivity. Nonshared environmental influences accounted for the majority of variance in each construct and were primarily unique to each. The unique genetic and nonshared environmental influences support the proposition that the executive self, self-esteem, and negative affectivity capture distinct and important differences between people.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)593-606
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of personality and social psychology
Volume89
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2005

Keywords

  • Behavior genetics
  • Executive self
  • Negative affect
  • Self-esteem

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science

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