Exercise performance and quality of life following surgical repair of anomalous aortic origin of a coronary artery in the pediatric population

J. A. Brothers*, M. G. McBride, B. S. Marino, R. S. Tomlinson, M. A. Seliem, M. H. Pampaloni, J. W. Gaynor, T. L. Spray, S. M. Paridon

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

22 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: We sought to evaluate exercise performance and quality of life in children after surgical repair of anomalous aortic origin of a coronary artery with an interarterial course. Methods: Patients who had surgery from October 2001 to January 2007 were eligible for inclusion. Exercise performance and quality of life were prospectively assessed by maximal exercise tests and age-appropriate questionnaires, respectively. We used t tests to compare pre- and postoperative exercise data and quality-of-life scores to published normative data. We performed linear regression analyses to assess associations between demographic, anatomic, and exercise variables and quality-of-life score. Results: Of 25/27 patients, 64% were boys, 68% had anomalous right coronary, 32% were asymptomatic. Average age at surgery was 10.8 (±4.1) years; median follow-up was 14.5 (2 to 48) months. Postoperative percent-predicted exercise values were: peak heart rate 97 (±6), working capacity 91 (±15), maximal oxygen consumption 82 (±16). In those who had preoperative exercise testing (n = 11), resting and maximal heart rates decreased significantly without significant change in exercise performance. Average child quality of life was 85/100 (±13) and parent-proxy 88 (±11) compared with normal scores of 83 (±15) and 88 (±12), respectively. Conclusion: There is mild chronotropic impairment in children and adolescents following anomalous coronary artery repair without a decline in exercise performance. This does not appear to impair their overall quality of life. Because long-term effects on heart rate, exercise performance, and quality of life are unknown, serial exercise tests should be included as routine care of these patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)380-384
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery
Volume137
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2009

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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