Exosomes expressing the self-antigens myosin and vimentin play an important role in syngeneic cardiac transplant rejection induced by antibodies to cardiac myosin

Monal Sharma, Wei Liu, Sudhir Perincheri, Muthukumar Gunasekaran, T. Mohanakumar*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

27 Scopus citations

Abstract

Long-term success of heart transplantation is hindered by humoral and cell-mediated immune responses. We studied preexisting antibodies to cardiac self-antigens, myosin and vimentin, and exosomes induced by antibodies to self-antigens in eliciting immune responses to cardiac grafts. After syngeneic heterotopic murine heart transplantation, rabbit anti-myosin or normal rabbit immunoglobulin was administered at day 0 or 7. Sera were collected after heartbeat cessation, cellular infiltration was analyzed, and exosomes were isolated from sera. Histopathologic examination of the controls' transplanted hearts demonstrated normal architecture, and their sera demonstrated neither antibodies to self-antigens nor exosomes expressing self-antigens. Administration of antibodies to cardiac myosin immediately posttransplantation (day 0) but not on day 7 triggered graft failure on day 7, and histopathologic examination revealed marked cellular infiltration with neutrophils and lymphocytes. Histopathologic examination of rejected hearts also demonstrated myocyte damage as sera had increased antibodies to myosin and vimentin and development of exosomes expressing self-antigens. Administration of exosomes isolated from failed grafts containing self-antigens induced graft dysfunction; exosomes isolated from stable mice did not induce graft failure. Antibodies to self-antigens can induce exosomes containing self-antigens, initiating an immune response and causing graft failure after cardiac transplantation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1626-1635
Number of pages10
JournalAmerican Journal of Transplantation
Volume18
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2018
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • animal models: murine
  • antigen presentation/recognition
  • autoantibody
  • autoantigen
  • autoimmunity
  • basic (laboratory) research/science
  • heart transplantation/cardiology
  • immunobiology
  • immunosuppression/immune modulation
  • translational research/science

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Transplantation
  • Pharmacology (medical)

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