Expanding Faculty Development of Teaching Skills: A National Needs Assessment of Pediatric Critical Care Medicine Faculty

Meredith F. Bone*, Richard Mink, Karen Marcdante, Angela S. Czaja, Stephanie A. Storgion, David A. Turner

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives: High-quality clinical teaching is an essential element in preparing trainees to become independently competent clinicians. In order to better understand the context-specific faculty development needs of teaching faculty in a specific community, we sought to determine the self-reported teaching skill deficits of pediatric critical care medicine faculty and their preferences and motivations regarding faculty development to enhance their teaching. Design: Modified Delphi technique was used to create an online survey in which respondents rated their need for education on a variety of teaching skills, their preferred learning modalities, and factors that motivate their participation in faculty development. Setting: Pediatric Critical Care Medicine divisions at the 64 sites in the United States with fellowship programs. Subjects: Five-hundred forty-five Pediatric Critical Care Medicine faculty who teach fellows and other trainees. Interventions: None. Measurements and Main Results: Response rate was 40%. Respondents reported a median of 8.5 years (interquartile range, 4-16 yr) as teaching faculty. The median age of faculty was 44.6 years (interquartile range, 38-50 yr). Only 20% of respondents indicated that improving their teaching was a low priority. Thirty-six percent of respondents had not participated in any formal teaching skill development as faculty. The most frequently cited factors motivating engagement in faculty development were education being included as part of regularly attended conferences, resources readily available when needed, and participation promoted by a supervisor. Preferred learning modalities included a brief discussion with a colleague, a 10-minute video, and a regular conference series. Conclusions: Pediatric Critical Care Medicine faculty reported they experience challenges in teaching and would benefit from faculty development training aimed at improving their knowledge and skills about being an educator. Preferred learning methods and motivating factors highlight the importance of efficiency in content delivery and endorsement by faculty supervisors. Consideration of these needs and preferences may be useful in creating context-focused, community of practice-based faculty development programs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)486-493
Number of pages8
JournalPediatric Critical Care Medicine
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2020

Keywords

  • critical care
  • curriculum
  • faculty
  • medical education
  • needs assessment
  • pediatric

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

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