Experiences and views of different key stakeholders on the feasibility of treating cancer-related fatigue

Claudia Canella*, Michael Mikolasek, Matthias Rostock, Matthias Guckenberger, Josef Jenewein, Esther Linka, Claudia Six, Sarah Stoll, Roger Stupp, Claudia M. Witt

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Although cancer-related fatigue (CRF) has gained increased attention in the past decade, therapy remains a challenge. Treatment programs are more likely to be effective if the needs and interests of the persons involved are well represented. This can be achieved by stakeholder engagement. In this paper, different key stakeholders' experiences and views on the feasibility of treating CRF in the context of supportive care in hospital environments are analyzed. Method: In a qualitative study with the aim of developing an integrative treatment program for CRF, a total of 22 stakeholders (6 medical oncologists, 5 nurses, 9 patients, 1 patient family member, 1 representative of the Swiss Cancer League) were interviewed either in a face-to-face (n = 12) or focus group setting (n = 2). For data analyses, the method of qualitative content analysis was used. Results: The stakeholders referred to different contextual factors when talking about the feasibility of treating CRF in the context of supportive care in hospital environments. These included: assessment, reporting and information; treatability; attitude; infrastructure, time-management, costs and affordability; and integrative approach. Conclusions: Key factors of a feasible treatment approach to CRF are a coherent, cost effective integrative treatment program facilitated by an interdisciplinary team of health care providers. Furthermore, the treatment approach should be patient orientated, adopting an individualized approach. The major challenges of making the integrative treatment program feasible for CRF are resources and interprofessional collaboration.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number458
JournalBMC cancer
Volume20
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - May 24 2020

Keywords

  • Cancer-related fatigue
  • Complementary medicine
  • Feasibility
  • Integrative treatment program
  • Qualitative study
  • Stakeholder engagement

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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