Experiences of community and parental violence among HIV-positive young racial/ethnic minority men who have sex with men

Gregory Phillips*, Lisa B. Hightow-Weidman, Sheldon D. Fields, Thomas P. Giordano, Angulique Y. Outlaw, Bonnie Halpern-Felsher, Amy R. Wohl

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

Adolescents and young adults (ages 13-24) in the USA are frequently exposed to violence in their community and home. While studies have examined the prevalence and impact of violence exposure among adolescents, there is a lack of data focusing specifically on adolescent men of color who have sex with men. Eight demonstration sites funded through a Special Projects of National Significance (SPNS) Initiative recruited 363 HIV-positive racial/ethnic minority young men who have sex with men (YMSM) for a longitudinal study between 2006 and 2009. Over two-thirds of participants (83.8%) had witnessed community violence, 55.1% in the prior three months. Witnessing violence committed with a deadly weapon was significantly associated with being African-American, having ever used drugs, and drinking alcohol in the prior two weeks. Fear of violence in the community was significantly associated with depressive symptomatology, having less than a high school degree, not possessing health insurance, and site of enrollment. Having been emotionally or physically abused by a parent or caretaker was significantly associated with depressive symptomatology, attempting suicide, site of enrollment, and increased age. Witnessing violence with a deadly weapon was significantly associated with alcohol and drug use but not with high-risk sexual behaviors. As this was one of the first studies on the prevalence and correlates of violence exposure among racial/ethnic minority YMSM living with HIV, the findings can be used to inform the development of culturally appropriate resilience-focused interventions to address the aftereffects of violence exposures and help develop social support systems outside of the family.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)827-834
Number of pages8
JournalAIDS Care - Psychological and Socio-Medical Aspects of AIDS/HIV
Volume26
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 3 2014

Keywords

  • Community violence
  • HIV
  • MSM
  • Parental violence
  • Violence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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