Experimentally elicited productions: Differences and similarities between mixed effects and ANOVA analyses

Matthew Goldrick*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalConference articlepeer-review

Abstract

Currently, many experimental studies of speech production use fully counterbalanced designs to examine variation in categorical (e.g, correct/incorrect) or relatively continuous measures (e.g., reaction times, voice onset times). These data present several challenges to ANOVA analyses. Some of these issues are well known to be the speech community; for example, the non-normality of dependent variables such as proportion correct. Others have been less extensively addressed; for example, many speech studies account for participant-but not item-specific contributions to variance. I discuss the opportunities and challenges in using linear mixed effects models to address these issues.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number060030
JournalProceedings of Meetings on Acoustics
Volume19
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013
Event21st International Congress on Acoustics, ICA 2013 - 165th Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America - Montreal, QC, Canada
Duration: Jun 2 2013Jun 7 2013

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Acoustics and Ultrasonics

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