Exploring the use of social network methods in designing healthcare quality improvement teams

David Meltzer*, Jeanette Chung, Parham Khalili, Elizabeth Marlow, Vineet Arora, Glen Schumock, Ron Burt

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

68 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Teams are an integral component of quality improvement efforts in healthcare organizations. Quality improvement teams may involve persons either from the same or different disciplines. In either case, the selection of team members may be critical to the team's success. However, there is little research to guide selection of team members for quality improvement teams. In this paper, we use tools from social network analysis (SNA) to derive principles for the design of effective clinical quality improvement teams and explore the implementation of these principles using social network data collected from the inpatient general medicine services at a large academic medical center in Chicago, USA. While the concept of multidisciplinary teams focuses on the importance of the professional background of team members, SNA emphasizes the importance of the individual and collective connections of team members, both to persons outside the team and to each other. SNA also focuses on the location of individuals and groups between other actors in the flow of information and other resources within larger organizational networks. We hypothesize that external connections may be most important when the collection or dissemination of information or influence are the greatest concerns, while the relationship of team members to each other may matter most when internal coordination, knowledge sharing, and within-group communication are most important. Our data suggest that the social networks of the attending physicians can be characterized sociometrically and that new sociometric measures such as " net degree" may be useful in identifying teams with the greatest potential for external influence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1119-1130
Number of pages12
JournalSocial Science and Medicine
Volume71
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2010

Fingerprint

Quality Improvement
Social Support
social network
Delivery of Health Care
network analysis
Information Dissemination
Inpatients
Communication
Medicine
Social Networks
Healthcare
Organizations
Physicians
general medicine
Research
human being
Group
physician

Keywords

  • General internal medicine
  • Hospitals
  • Quality improvement
  • Social network analysis
  • Teams
  • USA

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • History and Philosophy of Science

Cite this

Meltzer, David ; Chung, Jeanette ; Khalili, Parham ; Marlow, Elizabeth ; Arora, Vineet ; Schumock, Glen ; Burt, Ron. / Exploring the use of social network methods in designing healthcare quality improvement teams. In: Social Science and Medicine. 2010 ; Vol. 71, No. 6. pp. 1119-1130.
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Exploring the use of social network methods in designing healthcare quality improvement teams. / Meltzer, David; Chung, Jeanette; Khalili, Parham; Marlow, Elizabeth; Arora, Vineet; Schumock, Glen; Burt, Ron.

In: Social Science and Medicine, Vol. 71, No. 6, 01.09.2010, p. 1119-1130.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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