Extent of lymphadenectomy and postoperative major complications among women with endometrial cancer treated with minimally invasive surgery

Rosa M. Polan*, Emma C. Rossi, Emma L. Barber

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: In patients with endometrial cancer, sentinel lymphadenectomy is used to accurately prognosticate extent of disease, and has been proposed as a method to decrease the incidence of medical and surgical complications associated with more extensive lymphadenectomy. It is unknown whether patients who undergo traditional lymphadenectomy experience major postoperative complications at the same rates as those who undergo sentinel lymphadenectomy or those who do not undergo lymphadenectomy. Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the incidence of major postoperative complications among endometrial cancer patients undergoing total laparoscopic hysterectomy with traditional lymphadenectomy vs sentinel or no lymphadenectomy. Materials and Methods: Patients with endometrial cancer who underwent total laparoscopic hysterectomy recorded in the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) database between 2015 and 2016 were identified using Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) and International Classification of Diseases (ICD) codes. Primary exposure was extent of lymphadenectomy. The primary outcome was major postoperative complications as defined by the Clavien−Dindo scale. Associations were examined with bivariable tests and multivariable logistic regression. Results: A total of 3282 women with endometrial cancer who underwent total laparoscopic hysterectomy were identified; of these, 2049 (62.4%) did not undergo lymphadenectomy, 1089 (33.2%) underwent traditional lymphadenectomy, and 144 (4.4%) underwent sentinel lymphadenectomy. Traditional lymphadenectomy had the highest rate of major complications (3.6%) compared with sentinel lymphadenectomy (2.0%) and no lymphadenectomy (2.0%) (P = .03). Patients who underwent traditional lymphadenectomy also had the longest operating room times and procedures that were most surgically complex (171 minutes, 30.6 relative value units [RVU]) compared with patients who underwent sentinel lymphadenectomy (166 minutes, 24.9 RVU) or no lymphadenectomy (141 minutes, 15.0 RVU) (all P < .001). Patients who underwent traditional lymphadenectomy had nearly twice the odds of a major complication (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.8; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.2–2.9) and need for readmission (aOR, 2.2; 95% CI, 1.5–3.4) compared to those who underwent sentinel or no lymphadenectomy. The incidence of readmission after traditional lymphadenectomy was higher (4.6%) than after sentinel lymphadenectomy (1.4%) and no lymphadenectomy (2.2%) (P < 0.001). Conclusion: Sentinel lymphadenectomy among patients undergoing total laparoscopic hysterectomy for endometrial cancer was associated with a decreased incidence of major postoperative complications and need for readmission when compared with traditional lymphadenectomy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)263.e1-263.e8
JournalAmerican journal of obstetrics and gynecology
Volume220
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2019

Keywords

  • Clavien-Dindo
  • endometrial cancer
  • minimally invasive surgery
  • postoperative complication
  • sentinel lymph node

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

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