Extreme thinking in clinically depressed adolescents: Results from the Treatment for Adolescents with Depression Study (TADS)

Rachel H. Jacobs*, Mark A Reinecke, Jacqueline K Gollan, Neil Jordan, Susan G. Silva, John S. March

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

The purpose of this report is to examine relations between extreme thinking, as measured by the Dysfunctional Attitudes Scale, and the maintenance of gains among adolescents who participated in the Treatment for Adolescents with Depression Study (TADS). We examine extreme thinking among 327 adolescents (mean age. = 14.56, 57% female, 75% White) who received cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), fluoxetine (FLX), or a combination of CBT and FLX (COMB). Among those who met remission status on the Children's Depression Rating Scale - Revised (CDRS-R ≤ 28; 56 at week 12, 79 at week 18) extreme thinking did not predict failure to maintain remission. This is in contrast to findings with depressed adults. Treatment influenced level of extreme thinking, and this appeared to be driven by greater endorsement of positively valenced beliefs as opposed to a decrease in negatively valenced beliefs. Developmental or investigation characteristics may account for the discrepancy in findings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1155-1159
Number of pages5
JournalBehaviour Research and Therapy
Volume48
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2010

Keywords

  • Adolescents
  • Cognitive therapy
  • Major depressive disorder
  • Recovery

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Extreme thinking in clinically depressed adolescents: Results from the Treatment for Adolescents with Depression Study (TADS)'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this