Fabrication of high-quality Ti joint with ultrafine grains using submerged friction stirring technology and its microstructural evolution mechanism

L. H. Wu, Xiaobing Hu, X. X. Zhang, Y. Z. Li, Z. Y. Ma, X. L. Ma, B. L. Xiao*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

It is rather challenging to obtain high-quality Ti joints by conventional friction stir welding because of the problem of over-heating. The welding process and final microstructures and properties of the joints are controlled by both plastic deformation and recrystallization. However, for a long time, studies have only focused on recrystallization mechanisms but ignored deformation modes. In this study, a defect-free ultrafine-grained Ti joint with a joint efficiency of 100% was for the first time produced by submerged friction stirring (SFS) technology. We utilized transmission electron microscopy with a two-beam diffraction technique and electron backscatter diffraction to systematically investigate the deformation mode versus the grain refinement mechanism. The finite element method was utilized to simulate the temperature field throughout the joint for the microstructural explanation. During the whole SFS, prismatic slip occurred, and the other dominant deformation mechanisms changed from {101¯2} twinning and basal slip to pyramidal <a + c> slip. The variation of slip modes was largely dependent on the twinning and temperature rise. The ultrafine-grained microstructure was attributed to the successive refinement effect of the twin-dislocation interaction, dislocation absorption, dynamic grain boundary migration and texture-induced grain convergence. The effect of the temperature, strain and strain rate on the microstructural evolution mechanisms was discussed. Based on our work, we expect the wide application of SFS in producing ultrafine-grained bulk Ti materials and high-quality joints.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)371-385
Number of pages15
JournalActa Materialia
Volume166
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2019

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Microstructural evolution
Twinning
Friction
Dislocations (crystals)
Fabrication
Friction stir welding
Time and motion study
Microstructure
Grain refinement
Electron diffraction
Strain rate
Plastic deformation
Welding
Grain boundaries
Temperature distribution
Textures
Diffraction
Transmission electron microscopy
Finite element method
Heating

Keywords

  • Deformation
  • Finite element simulation
  • Friction stir
  • Recrystallization
  • Titanium

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Ceramics and Composites
  • Polymers and Plastics
  • Metals and Alloys

Cite this

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title = "Fabrication of high-quality Ti joint with ultrafine grains using submerged friction stirring technology and its microstructural evolution mechanism",
abstract = "It is rather challenging to obtain high-quality Ti joints by conventional friction stir welding because of the problem of over-heating. The welding process and final microstructures and properties of the joints are controlled by both plastic deformation and recrystallization. However, for a long time, studies have only focused on recrystallization mechanisms but ignored deformation modes. In this study, a defect-free ultrafine-grained Ti joint with a joint efficiency of 100{\%} was for the first time produced by submerged friction stirring (SFS) technology. We utilized transmission electron microscopy with a two-beam diffraction technique and electron backscatter diffraction to systematically investigate the deformation mode versus the grain refinement mechanism. The finite element method was utilized to simulate the temperature field throughout the joint for the microstructural explanation. During the whole SFS, prismatic slip occurred, and the other dominant deformation mechanisms changed from {101¯2} twinning and basal slip to pyramidal slip. The variation of slip modes was largely dependent on the twinning and temperature rise. The ultrafine-grained microstructure was attributed to the successive refinement effect of the twin-dislocation interaction, dislocation absorption, dynamic grain boundary migration and texture-induced grain convergence. The effect of the temperature, strain and strain rate on the microstructural evolution mechanisms was discussed. Based on our work, we expect the wide application of SFS in producing ultrafine-grained bulk Ti materials and high-quality joints.",
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Fabrication of high-quality Ti joint with ultrafine grains using submerged friction stirring technology and its microstructural evolution mechanism. / Wu, L. H.; Hu, Xiaobing; Zhang, X. X.; Li, Y. Z.; Ma, Z. Y.; Ma, X. L.; Xiao, B. L.

In: Acta Materialia, Vol. 166, 01.03.2019, p. 371-385.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Fabrication of high-quality Ti joint with ultrafine grains using submerged friction stirring technology and its microstructural evolution mechanism

AU - Wu, L. H.

AU - Hu, Xiaobing

AU - Zhang, X. X.

AU - Li, Y. Z.

AU - Ma, Z. Y.

AU - Ma, X. L.

AU - Xiao, B. L.

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AB - It is rather challenging to obtain high-quality Ti joints by conventional friction stir welding because of the problem of over-heating. The welding process and final microstructures and properties of the joints are controlled by both plastic deformation and recrystallization. However, for a long time, studies have only focused on recrystallization mechanisms but ignored deformation modes. In this study, a defect-free ultrafine-grained Ti joint with a joint efficiency of 100% was for the first time produced by submerged friction stirring (SFS) technology. We utilized transmission electron microscopy with a two-beam diffraction technique and electron backscatter diffraction to systematically investigate the deformation mode versus the grain refinement mechanism. The finite element method was utilized to simulate the temperature field throughout the joint for the microstructural explanation. During the whole SFS, prismatic slip occurred, and the other dominant deformation mechanisms changed from {101¯2} twinning and basal slip to pyramidal slip. The variation of slip modes was largely dependent on the twinning and temperature rise. The ultrafine-grained microstructure was attributed to the successive refinement effect of the twin-dislocation interaction, dislocation absorption, dynamic grain boundary migration and texture-induced grain convergence. The effect of the temperature, strain and strain rate on the microstructural evolution mechanisms was discussed. Based on our work, we expect the wide application of SFS in producing ultrafine-grained bulk Ti materials and high-quality joints.

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