Face Name Associative Memory Exam and biomarker status in the ARMADA study: Advancing reliable measurement in Alzheimer's disease and cognitive aging

Dorene M. Rentz*, Hannah M. Klinger, Aubryn Samaroo, Colleen Fitzpatrick, Olivia R. Schneider, Saki Amagai, John Devin Peipert

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

The Face Name Associative Memory Exam (FNAME) was introduced into the NIH Toolbox as part of the ARMADA study and establishes normative data for diverse participants, ages 64 to 85+, and proposes cutoff scores between biomarker positive versus negative (+/−) groups. The FNAME was administered to 257 participants across the clinical spectrum with 122 having amyloid biomarkers. Linear regression explored the association between demographics and FNAME and between amyloid (+/−) groups. Receiver operating characteristic curves (ROC) identified performance thresholds that best discriminated between biomarker (+/−) individuals. Lower FNAME scores occurred in males, older ages, Black/African Americans, Hispanics, and biomarker-positive participants. ROC analyses demonstrated acceptable accuracy (0.73 to 0.77) but only when combined with clinical status. The diagnostic discrimination of amyloid positivity was acceptable but not excellent, suggesting the FNAME may be a better screening indicator of clinical status rather than amyloid deposition in cognitively normal individuals. Normative data are provided.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere12473
JournalAlzheimer's and Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment and Disease Monitoring
Volume15
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2023

Keywords

  • Alzheimer's disease
  • NIH Toolbox
  • cognition
  • dementia
  • mild cognitive impairment
  • neuropsychology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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