Factors Affecting Quality of Life at Different Intervals After Treatment of Localized Prostate Cancer

Unique Influence of Treatment Decision Making Satisfaction, Personality and Sexual Functioning

David E Victorson*, Stephanie Schuette, Benjamin David Schalet, Shilajit D Kundu, Brian T. Helfand, Kristian Novakovic, Nathaniel Sufrin, Michael McGuire, Charles Brendler

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose Using patient reported outcomes measures we identified the most informative set of factors associated with quality of life in a large sample of men treated for localized prostate cancer. Materials and Methods We examined relationships with quality of life using FACIT (Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy). We also hypothesized variables in a sample of men diagnosed with localized prostate cancer who represented different time points since treatment, including less than 12 months in 70, 1 to 3 years in 344, greater than 3 to 5 years in 291 and greater than 5 years in 97. Correlative measures included subscales of MAX-PC (Memorial Anxiety Scale for Prostate Cancer), short forms of PROMIS® and SOMS (Surgical Outcomes Measurement System), TDM-SATS (Treatment Decision-Making Satisfaction Scale) and subscales of the BFI (Big Five Inventory) of personality. Results Quality of life was significantly associated with hypothesized variables across different time cohorts. In regression models several factors accounted for most of the variability in quality of life scores depending on time since treatment, including 47%, 22%, 29% and 27% at less than 12 months, 1 to 3 years, greater than 3 to 5 years and greater than 5 years, respectively. Upon examining the unique contribution of these variables, treatment decision making satisfaction was the only variable to have a significant and unique contribution to quality of life across all 4 time cohorts (standardized coefficients 0.33, 0.27, 0.31 and 0.49, respectively, p <0.01). In the cohort with 1 to 3 years since treatment erectile function and neurotic personality style also had unique associations with quality of life (standardized coefficients 0.25 and −0.20, respectively). Conclusions When considering the short-term and the longer term quality of life of a man after treatment for localized prostate cancer, our findings highlight the importance of treatment decision making satisfaction, erectile function and personality.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1422-1428
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Urology
Volume196
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2016

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Orgasm
Personality
Prostatic Neoplasms
Decision Making
Quality of Life
Therapeutics
Personality Inventory
Chronic Disease
Anxiety

Keywords

  • decision making
  • neuroticism
  • prostatic neoplasms
  • quality of life
  • surveys and questionnaires

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

Cite this

@article{4f076a8f0b5748c0bfbc4723bfe7daed,
title = "Factors Affecting Quality of Life at Different Intervals After Treatment of Localized Prostate Cancer: Unique Influence of Treatment Decision Making Satisfaction, Personality and Sexual Functioning",
abstract = "Purpose Using patient reported outcomes measures we identified the most informative set of factors associated with quality of life in a large sample of men treated for localized prostate cancer. Materials and Methods We examined relationships with quality of life using FACIT (Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy). We also hypothesized variables in a sample of men diagnosed with localized prostate cancer who represented different time points since treatment, including less than 12 months in 70, 1 to 3 years in 344, greater than 3 to 5 years in 291 and greater than 5 years in 97. Correlative measures included subscales of MAX-PC (Memorial Anxiety Scale for Prostate Cancer), short forms of PROMIS{\circledR} and SOMS (Surgical Outcomes Measurement System), TDM-SATS (Treatment Decision-Making Satisfaction Scale) and subscales of the BFI (Big Five Inventory) of personality. Results Quality of life was significantly associated with hypothesized variables across different time cohorts. In regression models several factors accounted for most of the variability in quality of life scores depending on time since treatment, including 47{\%}, 22{\%}, 29{\%} and 27{\%} at less than 12 months, 1 to 3 years, greater than 3 to 5 years and greater than 5 years, respectively. Upon examining the unique contribution of these variables, treatment decision making satisfaction was the only variable to have a significant and unique contribution to quality of life across all 4 time cohorts (standardized coefficients 0.33, 0.27, 0.31 and 0.49, respectively, p <0.01). In the cohort with 1 to 3 years since treatment erectile function and neurotic personality style also had unique associations with quality of life (standardized coefficients 0.25 and −0.20, respectively). Conclusions When considering the short-term and the longer term quality of life of a man after treatment for localized prostate cancer, our findings highlight the importance of treatment decision making satisfaction, erectile function and personality.",
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author = "Victorson, {David E} and Stephanie Schuette and Schalet, {Benjamin David} and Kundu, {Shilajit D} and Helfand, {Brian T.} and Kristian Novakovic and Nathaniel Sufrin and Michael McGuire and Charles Brendler",
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Factors Affecting Quality of Life at Different Intervals After Treatment of Localized Prostate Cancer : Unique Influence of Treatment Decision Making Satisfaction, Personality and Sexual Functioning. / Victorson, David E; Schuette, Stephanie; Schalet, Benjamin David; Kundu, Shilajit D; Helfand, Brian T.; Novakovic, Kristian; Sufrin, Nathaniel; McGuire, Michael; Brendler, Charles.

In: Journal of Urology, Vol. 196, No. 5, 01.11.2016, p. 1422-1428.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Factors Affecting Quality of Life at Different Intervals After Treatment of Localized Prostate Cancer

T2 - Unique Influence of Treatment Decision Making Satisfaction, Personality and Sexual Functioning

AU - Victorson, David E

AU - Schuette, Stephanie

AU - Schalet, Benjamin David

AU - Kundu, Shilajit D

AU - Helfand, Brian T.

AU - Novakovic, Kristian

AU - Sufrin, Nathaniel

AU - McGuire, Michael

AU - Brendler, Charles

PY - 2016/11/1

Y1 - 2016/11/1

N2 - Purpose Using patient reported outcomes measures we identified the most informative set of factors associated with quality of life in a large sample of men treated for localized prostate cancer. Materials and Methods We examined relationships with quality of life using FACIT (Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy). We also hypothesized variables in a sample of men diagnosed with localized prostate cancer who represented different time points since treatment, including less than 12 months in 70, 1 to 3 years in 344, greater than 3 to 5 years in 291 and greater than 5 years in 97. Correlative measures included subscales of MAX-PC (Memorial Anxiety Scale for Prostate Cancer), short forms of PROMIS® and SOMS (Surgical Outcomes Measurement System), TDM-SATS (Treatment Decision-Making Satisfaction Scale) and subscales of the BFI (Big Five Inventory) of personality. Results Quality of life was significantly associated with hypothesized variables across different time cohorts. In regression models several factors accounted for most of the variability in quality of life scores depending on time since treatment, including 47%, 22%, 29% and 27% at less than 12 months, 1 to 3 years, greater than 3 to 5 years and greater than 5 years, respectively. Upon examining the unique contribution of these variables, treatment decision making satisfaction was the only variable to have a significant and unique contribution to quality of life across all 4 time cohorts (standardized coefficients 0.33, 0.27, 0.31 and 0.49, respectively, p <0.01). In the cohort with 1 to 3 years since treatment erectile function and neurotic personality style also had unique associations with quality of life (standardized coefficients 0.25 and −0.20, respectively). Conclusions When considering the short-term and the longer term quality of life of a man after treatment for localized prostate cancer, our findings highlight the importance of treatment decision making satisfaction, erectile function and personality.

AB - Purpose Using patient reported outcomes measures we identified the most informative set of factors associated with quality of life in a large sample of men treated for localized prostate cancer. Materials and Methods We examined relationships with quality of life using FACIT (Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy). We also hypothesized variables in a sample of men diagnosed with localized prostate cancer who represented different time points since treatment, including less than 12 months in 70, 1 to 3 years in 344, greater than 3 to 5 years in 291 and greater than 5 years in 97. Correlative measures included subscales of MAX-PC (Memorial Anxiety Scale for Prostate Cancer), short forms of PROMIS® and SOMS (Surgical Outcomes Measurement System), TDM-SATS (Treatment Decision-Making Satisfaction Scale) and subscales of the BFI (Big Five Inventory) of personality. Results Quality of life was significantly associated with hypothesized variables across different time cohorts. In regression models several factors accounted for most of the variability in quality of life scores depending on time since treatment, including 47%, 22%, 29% and 27% at less than 12 months, 1 to 3 years, greater than 3 to 5 years and greater than 5 years, respectively. Upon examining the unique contribution of these variables, treatment decision making satisfaction was the only variable to have a significant and unique contribution to quality of life across all 4 time cohorts (standardized coefficients 0.33, 0.27, 0.31 and 0.49, respectively, p <0.01). In the cohort with 1 to 3 years since treatment erectile function and neurotic personality style also had unique associations with quality of life (standardized coefficients 0.25 and −0.20, respectively). Conclusions When considering the short-term and the longer term quality of life of a man after treatment for localized prostate cancer, our findings highlight the importance of treatment decision making satisfaction, erectile function and personality.

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KW - neuroticism

KW - prostatic neoplasms

KW - quality of life

KW - surveys and questionnaires

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