Failed primary management of iatrogenic biliary injury: Incidence and significance of concomitant hepatic arterial disruption

Alan Koffron, Mario Ferrario, Willis Parsons, Albert Nemcek, Mark Saker, Michael Abecassis*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

109 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background. Vasculobiliary injury (VBI) is a well-recognized complication of laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC). In patients with failed primary management of bile duct injury (BDI), an assessment of the hepatic arterial system may be important to determine the presence of VBI. This study was conducted to determine the incidence of VBI in patients with failed primary management of LC-related BDI and to establish a potential correlation between the level of BDI and the incidence of VBI. Methods. A retrospective review was conducted on 18 patients referred for failed primary management of LC-related BDI who underwent prospective arteriography as part of the preoperative work-up. Results. Of the 18 patients who sustained BDI, Bismuth level 4 lesions were found in 7 patients (39%), level 3 in 8 patients (44%), and level 2 in 3 patients (17%). VBI was identified on arteriography in 11 patients (61%). VBI was present in 71% of patients with level 4 lesions, 63% of patients with level 3 lesions, and 33% of patients with level 2 lesions. The time interval from primary management to its failure was longer in VBI than in BDI alone. Conclusions. We have observed a high incidence of VBI in patients with failed primary management of LC-related BDI. Arterial disruption may affect the outcome of primary management of BDI.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)722-731
Number of pages10
JournalSurgery
Volume130
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

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